Top 5: Films on Demand, March 2015

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Many Tongues Called English, One World Language (52 mins)
This program explores how America’s rise as an economic power made it the driving force behind the spread of English in the 20th century. A world tour illustrates how English has mixed with other languages-from “Franglais” in France to “Singlish” in Singapore-and how the dollar’s power, coupled with the lure of consumerism, has made English the international trade language. Bringing it full circle, host Melvyn Bragg returns to the British Isles to survey English as it is spoken there now, measuring the influence of American slang and vocabulary from other languages.

4. V. S. Naipaul: The Enigma of Writing (53 mins)
In this program, novelist V. S. Naipaul, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Literature, explores the relationship between a writer and his work, offering insights into his life, his career, and his subtly incisive novel/memoir The Enigma of Arrival. In particular, he contrasts the inspiration of living in the English countryside with the Caribbean, Indian, and African influences that dominate his earlier writings. Excerpts from Miguel Street, A House for Mr. Biswas, and other books-read by actor Roshan Seth and by Naipaul himself-round out this engaging interview.

3. Seeds of Change: A Case Study of Sustainable Development in China (48 mins)
After surviving an emergency crash-landing, Dr. Sam Chao resolved to do something that would make a difference in the world. This award-winning program follows the outcome of his resolution: ECO, the Ecological Conservancy Outreach fund. Donating his life savings to the project, Dr. Chao enlists his childhood friend, Dr. Larry Wang, to clean up the Yangtze River and its tributaries, ravaged by erosion due to deforestation. As the video shows, sustainable ecological improvement must be linked to economic improvement for farmers whose very lives hang in the balance of such plans. Filmed largely in China’s Yunnan province, Seeds of Change visits the farmers who switch from growing crops on the riverbanks to forest-based agriculture.

2. Diversity in the Workplace: Playing Your Part (23 mins)
In workplaces, as in any other part of society, people are diverse. They come from different cultures and may have different belief systems, values, and religions. There is also diversity in interpersonal styles, mental ability, sexual orientation, age, and ways of thinking and learning. Using dramatized scenarios, this program shows how a wide range of personnel can work together successfully. Topics covered include the scope of diversity, responding sensitively, knowing the guidelines, communicating appropriately, and building on diversity.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for March is:

1. Creative Healing in Mental Health: Art and Drama in Assessment and Therapy (50 mins)
Art enables even those with little or no language to express themselves more fully and to project aspects of themselves that can be otherwise hard for therapists to intuit. This program guides mental health clinicians through the process of effectively utilizing art and drama in patient assessment and treatment. The video explains how to design a playful, nonjudgmental setting for these therapies, suggesting materials such as toys, masks, and costumes along with art supplies, and providing strategies to enhance creativity. Considerations of what to offer based on clinical goals are followed by demonstrations of how to invite patients to safely reflect on their artistic process.

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