Top 5: Films on Demand, June 2017

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Fanfare for America: The Composer Aaron Copland (58 mins)
This documentary presents an artful blending of the life and music of one of America’s great modern composers. The many milestones in Copland’s long career are discussed by his biographer, Howard Pollock, while stirring images of Copland’s native city are set to selections of his music as performed by the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra.

4. Alice Walker (33 mins)
Alice Walker describes how the Civil Rights movement transformed her life, defines her concept of “womanism,” and explains her recurrent theme of a woman’s recovery of wholeness through resistance to racism and sexism.

3. Search for Identity—American Passages: A Literary Survey (27 mins)
Even as the poets were fostering a rebellion, contemporary prose writers began creating a new American tradition comprised of many strands, many voices, and many myths about the past. This program explores the search for identity by three American writers: Maxine Hong Kingston, Sandra Cisneros, and Leslie Feinberg.

2. A Conversation with Igor Stravinsky—From NBC’s Wisdom Series (29 mins)
This 1957 NBC program opens with the composer at his piano as he creates a “sketch” or initial concept for a new piece; it then records a detailed conversation between Stravinsky and his protégé, respected American musicologist and conductor Robert Craft.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for June is:

1. The Common School: 1770–1890 (55 mins)
This program profiles the passionate crusade launched by Thomas Jefferson and continued by Noah Webster, Horace Mann, and others to create a common system of tax-supported schools that would mix people of different backgrounds and reinforce the bonds of democracy. A wealth of research illustrates how this noble experiment—the foundation of the young republic—was a radical idea opposed from the start by racial prejudice and fears of taxation.

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