GIL Express training

It’s been a long road but we can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel. The new library system is up and running, and soon GIL Express will be back, too. Your favorite resource sharing service will work a little differently, but never fear! We’re here to help you along the way. We know change is never easy so we’ve set up a number of training sessions to get you acquainted with the new system.

No need to register or RSVP. Just drop in to whichever session fits with your schedule. Each session should last ~30 minutes.

If you are unable to attend one of these sessions and would like instruction in placing GIL Express requests, please schedule an appointment with a library staff member here: http://clayton.libcal.com/booking/research and don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions or concerns: library@clayton.libanswers.com

Advertisements

UPDATE: Catalog changes coming in May

Earlier this year we notified you about an upgrade to our Integrated Library System (ILS). The implementation process is now in full-swing and the finish line is in sight. As a reminder, the most noticeable effect of this project will be a new look to our catalog.

On May 26th, all links for the CSU Catalog and GIL Express Catalog will redirect to a unified interface. An additional feature of the new system is the ability to personalize your search experience by signing in with your Loch ID.

Below are upcoming key dates for our implementation:

4/24 – 5/26 Library catalog becomes read-only and no new items will be added to the collection.

5/5 – 5/26 GIL Express requests suspended

5/19 – 6/6 Patron records become read-only and will require manual update when needed. Please allow additional time to borrow materials.

5/22 – 5/25 Circulation becomes read-only and all item borrowing will be manual. Please allow additional time to borrow materials.

5/26 Migration complete. Everything works exactly as it should. 🙂

We look forward to providing you with improved ways to access our materials. However, with a project this big, issues will occur. Thank you for your patience as we look forward to improving our service to each of you.

To stay up-to-date on developments with this project, follow the Clayton State Library blog at: https://claytonstatelibrary.wordpress.com, and don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions or concerns: library@clayton.libanswers.com

 

Wanna be a star? Come join our team

Are you a problem solver? Do you enjoy helping others reach their goals? Are you a quick learner, comfortable with new technology? Then the library might have a job for you.

We are looking for some stellar student assistants to work the service counters on both Upper and Lower Levels of the library.

Responsibilities

We need more smiling faces at the Ref Desk

General duties will include answering basic library questions, greeting patrons in person and over the phone, assisting with library equipment, checking in and out library materials, and maintaining order of library collections on the shelf. Specific duties will vary depending on the service counter.

Student assistants at the Lower Level Circulation Desk will shelve and shift items in the circulating collections and assist in opening and closing the library. At the Upper Level Reference Desk, student assistants will monitor the online chat service, provide basic reference and technology assistance, and assist with closing the library. All student assistants will be cross-trained to perform desk duties on the both levels of the Library for when back up is needed.

Requirements

The right candidates will demonstrate a commitment to customer service, attention to detail, and the ability to work independently and as part of a team. Dependability and flexibility are also required. Candidates for the Upper Level Reference Desk position should also demonstrate good written and verbal communication skills and have some computer experience. Both positions require the use an Integrated Library System, so the ability to learn new technology is required.

Qualifications

Kara needs some help at the Circ Desk

To qualify, you must be an undergraduate student in good academic standing. We are currently accepting applications for Summer 2017 and Fall 2017 semesters. Student assistants may work a maximum of 19.5 hours per week. Assigned weekly hours will vary depending on student availability and library coverage needs. Most student assistants work between 12-15 hours per week.

Typical shifts are 3-5 hours long. Semester hours are below:

Summer Fall
Mon – Thurs 8am – 9pm 8am – 10pm
Fri 8am – 6pm 8am – 6pm
Sat CLOSED 9am – 6pm
Sun 12pm – 9pm 1pm – 10pm

If this sounds like you and you are available to work during the available time slots, please download, complete, and submit the Library Student Assistant application to: LibraryJobs@groups.clayton.edu.

Please direct all questions to LibraryJobs@groups.clayton.edu

New exhibit: Harry Potter’s World

Harry Potter’s World letterhead with owl

Harry Potter’s World letterhead with owl

It’s here! It’s here! The Hogwarts Express has arrived. Hop on Platform 9 3/4 and take a ride to Harry Potter’s World.

For the next six weeks, the library is hosting a special exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine, developed and produced by the Exhibition Program at the National Library of Medicine.

In 1997, British author J.  K.  Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born.  Millions of readers have followed Harry to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry where he discovers his heritage, encounters new plants and animals, and perfects his magical abilities.  Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy.  Incorporating the work of several 15th- and 16th-century thinkers, the seven-part series examines important ethical topics such as the desire for knowledge, the effects of prejudice, and the responsibility that comes with power.

This exhibition, using materials from the National Library of Medicine, explores Harry Potter’s world, its roots in Renaissance science, and the ethical questions that affected not only the wizards of Harry Potter, but also the historical thinkers featured in the series.

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine is on display in the University Archives within the Clayton State Library until April 28th. In conjunction with this exhibit, the library will host a celebration with games, prizes, and refreshments, as well as a series of faculty lectures.

Six banner traveling exhibition of Harry Potter's World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine on display at the National Library of Medicine

Six banner traveling exhibition of Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine on display at the National Library of Medicine

March 20th – April 28th – Exhibit available in the University Archives

March 23rdOpening celebration 1pm – 3pm Upper Level Library

Faculty Lectures in Library room L200:

  • Tuesday, March 28 11:00 am –Kathryn Pratt Russell – Convergence of Renaissance and contemporary money in the Harry Potter World.
  • Wednesday, April 5 12:00 pm – Antoinette Miller – Interactive presentation exploring the context and information on various potions their links to various psychological phenomena.
  • Thursday, April 13 12:00 pm – Seth Shaw & Josh Kitchens – Immortality through memory and an exploration of magical and muggle attempts to preserve memory
  • Monday, April 17 1:00 pm – Michelle Furlong – Mendelian genetics of wizards

This exhibition is brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

For more information, visit http://clayton.libguides.com/HarryPottersWorld or contact Erin Nagel, 678-466-4330.

Catalog Changes Coming in May

Along with other libraries in the University System of Georgia, Clayton State is in the final stages to implement a new Integrated Library System (ILS). An Integrated Library System is a fancy name for what we use to keep track of the items we own and who has them checked out. For patrons of our library, the most noticeable effects of this project will be a new interface to our catalog. On May 26th the CSU Catalog http://gilfind.clayton.edu and GIL Express Catalog http://gilfinduc.usg.edu will be redirected to our new combined catalog interface.

gilfindcatalog

Implementation updates:

  • Upon implementation, we are excited to announce that our patrons will be able to utilize their Loch ID (same credentials used on the SWAN) to manage their Library Account, GIL Express Requests, and a personalized search experience. Say good bye to your 5-digit PIN.
  • GIL Express will continue to operate, however, a short pause may occur in service. Interlibrary loan will continue to operate during any lapse in service. Please plan accordingly if you need resources from other libraries for your summer semester courses or research projects.
  • Training is currently in planning stages. We will share more information soon, but you can expect the training to begin in late April 2017.

Library staff recently attended a 3 day workshop to become more familiar with the new ILS and catalog interface. We continue testing workflow scenarios and data to insure this transition goes as smoothly as possible. However, with a project this big, issues will occur. Thank you for your patience as we work to improve our service to each of you.

To stay up-to-date on developments with this project, follow the Clayton State Library blog at: https://claytonstatelibrary.wordpress.com, and don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions or concerns: library@clayton.libanswers.com

Audio Content Added to Issues & Controversies

NPR audio content and podcasts including episodes of On Point and Fresh Air are now part of Issues & Controversies. Along with the original recordings, many feature transcripts of the entire broadcast or selected highlights. Find this new content under the Media tab for selected articles on topics like immigration policy, voter identification laws, and police brutality.

audio-issuescontroversies

Issues and Controversies helps researchers understand the crucial issues we face today, exploring hot topics in business, politics, government, education and popular culture. It offers in-depth articles made to inspire thought-provoking debates. Need more content to support your position? Try CQ Researcher Plus Archive

Films on Demand: Recent Additions

Films on Demand is our online streaming media resource. We are highlighting some of the titles that were added to our subscription last month.

thumbnail of media player with first scene thumbnail of media player with first scenethumbnail of media player with first scene

  •  Public Speaking—Informative and Persuasive Speeches (35:17) – Learn different strategies for writing and delivering two types of speeches: persuasive and informative
  •  American Umpire (56:06) – This thought-provoking documentary about U.S. foreign policy chronicles how the United States became the world’s policeman and questions how long the U.S. must continue to play this role.
  •  Counter Histories: Rock Hill (28:08) – In a world grappling with issues of equality in all forms, the story of the Friendship 9 rings in our ears as powerfully as ever.
  • Marketing Strategy Case Studies: The Starbucks Experience (26:55) – This program looks at the role of acquisition, brand-stretching, social media, and new channel development in Starbucks’ success and considers criticisms of some of the company’s policies.
  • Project Greenglow and the Quest for Gravity Control (51:04) – This program explores science’s obsession with the idea of gravity control.
  • Should You Really Play Video Games? (51:42) – The film explores how developers engineer their games and the impact of gaming on behavior, physiology, and neurobiology.
  • Climate Change: The EPA Has Gone Overboard: A Debate (01:40:20) – Intelligence Squared US debate.
  • B.B King – Life of Riley (01:36:45) – Starting with his childhood on the plantations in Mississippi, it follows the struggles B.B. King has faced throughout his life, including prejudice and segregation.
  • Curing Alzheimer’s (50:13) – This film looks at the promising work on all fronts, from the scientists working on catching the disease at its earliest stages to the researchers working to understand the causes.
  • Great War Stories (51:16) – This moving film shows how the unfolding conflict of the First World War affected ordinary people caught up on the front line and on the home front.

Need additional multimedia resources? Use our LibGuides, http://clayton.libguides.com/multimedia, as a starting point.

February Featured Resource: Politics in America

Politics in America offers comprehensive, nonpartisan commentary and data about members of Congress. Detailed member profiles provide concise insight and candid analysis of personalities, political styles, legislative agendas, political ambitions, and reputations at home and on the Hill.

Coverage includes:

  • Editions 2000 (106th Congress) – 2016 (114th Congress)

Member profiles include:

  • Biographical data, committee assignments, election results, CQ Key Votes, interest group ratings, CQ Vote Studies, and contact information
  • Detailed descriptions of each member’s congressional district as drawn for that term of Congress, including updated maps and voting trends

feb17source
Advanced Search users can limit results by:

  • Edition (Congress)
  • State
  • Political Party
  • Chamber

Need additional resources for political science? Use our LibGuides, http://clayton.libguides.com/subject/politicalscience, as a starting point.

Tax Season: Forms and Assistance

Tax season has officially started, so it is time to gather together those important documents. We have collected helpful resources for filing both your state and federal taxes. Needing more tips? Subscribe to Tax Tips from the IRS to receive a tip via email each business day during the tax-filing season.


The College of Business sponsors VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) which provides free tax preparation on a first come first serve basis. The service is offered on Saturdays from 9am – 1pm in the College of Business building. Contact (678) 466-4527 for more information.

Clayton State University Resources
VITA @ Clayton State

Georgia Resources
Georgia Department of Revenue
Taxpayer Assistance Centers in Georgia

Federal Resources
IRS.gov – Internal Revenue Service
USA.gov – File Your Taxes
Tax eFile
Tax Information for Students — Higher Education
Tax Benefits for Education
Publication 501: Do I have to file a tax return?
1098 tax form

Social Media and Apps
IRS2Go: IRS-developed app for Android, Amazon, and iOs designed to help taxpayers check on the status of their refund, sign up for helpful tax tips or get the most recent IRS Twitter feeds
Twitter – IRS News: news, guidance for the public
YouTube – IRS: tax tips, identify theft, small business, IRS tax pros
Tumblr – IRS: tax tips, videos, podcasts and more

 

 

flickr photo shared by kenteegardin under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license

PACE – Library partnership pt. 3 of 3

This blog post features guest contributors Jordan Knight and Evelyn Tran, students in Dr. Margaret Fletcher’s Fall 2016 ENGL 1101 PACE class. To learn more about PACE, visit: http://clayton.edu/PACE.


In the News: Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

On the 13th of September, the Clayton State Library Department presented the Freedom Summer film which is one of a five-part film series in the Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle program. A large audience of students, professors, and community members were present to view the film, listen to the panel discussion, and participate in the open discussion which followed.

The film focuses on the struggles that African Americans had to endure during Freedom Summer of 1964 in Mississippi.  During this time African Americans were oppressed by Jim Crow laws such as literacy tests and poll taxes which kept them from voting. Civil rights activists like Fannie Lou Hamer and Robert “Bob” Moses as well as civil rights organizations such as the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) and SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), began hosting voter registration drives and local sit-ins to protest the unequal exclusion of minorities in the democratic voting process.

If you would like to learn more about the events and people highlighted in the film or the discussion, we suggest the following resources:

http://clayton.libguides.com/CreatedEqual/FreedomSummer (Event covered at Clayton State University).

http://crdl.usg.edu/events/freedom_summer/ (Civil Rights Digital Library – Freedom Summer)

Freedom Schools

Throughout the summer of 1964, Freedom Schools were opened in black communities to provide a richer educational experience than was offered in Mississippi public schools. African American children learned of their own heritage and the heroes such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass who fought for freedom and equal rights.  In addition they improved their basic skills such as reading and writing, which enabled them to better understand the historical movement that was taking place.  These schools allowed them to gain the knowledge and courage to become a force for change in their local communities. Some further readings on Freedom Schools include the following sources:

http://www.educationanddemocracy.org/ED_FSC.html  (Freedom School Curriculum website)

Adickes, S. (2005). Legacy of a Freedom School. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Electronic book available through GALILEO*

Emery, K. (2007). The lessons of Freedom Summer. Race, Poverty and the Environment, 14(2), 20-22. Available via JSTOR* or online open access.

Emery, K., Gold, L.R., and Braselman, S. (2008). Lessons from Freedom Summer: Ordinary people building extraordinary movements. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press. Available via InterLibrary Loan request.

Freedom Summer

From the achievements, the suffering, and the determination of civil rights activists during Freedom Summer, the Civil Rights Movement grew, and ultimately the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 radically changed the South to legally eliminate Jim Crow laws.

If you would like to learn more information about the influence and impact of Freedom Summer (1964), the Clayton State Library suggests the following resources:

Burrows, N., Helton, L.E., Levy, L.B., and McDowell, D.E. (2014). Freedom Summer and its legacies in the classroom. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 155-172.*

Edmonds, M. and Haller, S. (2014). Images from Freedom Summer, 1964. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 51-63.*

McDaniel, H. N. (2016). Growing up civil rights: Youth voices from Mississippi’s Freedom Summer. The Southern Quarterly, 53, 94-107.*

Norman, B. (2014). What are all these bodies doing in the River? Freedom Summer and the cultural imagination. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 173-178.*

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle was made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

For more information about the Created Equal program, please visit: http://createdequal.neh.gov.

We invite you to look forward to the upcoming A Place for All People poster exhibit which will be presented at Clayton State University Library in 2017. This artistic presentation will celebrate the opening of the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture by displaying A Place for All People, an exhibit of posters that exhibit the African American story through images of “pain and glory, power and civility, enslavement and freedom.” For more information about the future event, please visit the following link: www.sites.si.edu/exhibitions/exhibits/AfricanAmericanPosters/index.htm and stay tuned to the Clayton State Library blog.