Films on Demand: Recent Additions

Films on Demand is our online streaming media resource. We are highlighting some of the titles that were added to our subscription last month.

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  •  Public Speaking—Informative and Persuasive Speeches (35:17) – Learn different strategies for writing and delivering two types of speeches: persuasive and informative
  •  American Umpire (56:06) – This thought-provoking documentary about U.S. foreign policy chronicles how the United States became the world’s policeman and questions how long the U.S. must continue to play this role.
  •  Counter Histories: Rock Hill (28:08) – In a world grappling with issues of equality in all forms, the story of the Friendship 9 rings in our ears as powerfully as ever.
  • Marketing Strategy Case Studies: The Starbucks Experience (26:55) – This program looks at the role of acquisition, brand-stretching, social media, and new channel development in Starbucks’ success and considers criticisms of some of the company’s policies.
  • Project Greenglow and the Quest for Gravity Control (51:04) – This program explores science’s obsession with the idea of gravity control.
  • Should You Really Play Video Games? (51:42) – The film explores how developers engineer their games and the impact of gaming on behavior, physiology, and neurobiology.
  • Climate Change: The EPA Has Gone Overboard: A Debate (01:40:20) – Intelligence Squared US debate.
  • B.B King – Life of Riley (01:36:45) – Starting with his childhood on the plantations in Mississippi, it follows the struggles B.B. King has faced throughout his life, including prejudice and segregation.
  • Curing Alzheimer’s (50:13) – This film looks at the promising work on all fronts, from the scientists working on catching the disease at its earliest stages to the researchers working to understand the causes.
  • Great War Stories (51:16) – This moving film shows how the unfolding conflict of the First World War affected ordinary people caught up on the front line and on the home front.

Need additional multimedia resources? Use our LibGuides, http://clayton.libguides.com/multimedia, as a starting point.

Top 5: Films on Demand, August 2016

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Women First & Foremost (183 mins)
Hosted by Rita Moreno and Dee Wallace Stone. Volume 1: Remember the Ladies, Volume 2: Touching the Clouds with Pen and Plane, and Volume 3: A Lady in the Spotlight

4. Moyers & Company: Trading Democracy for “Security” (56 mins)
The violent Boston rampage triggered a government response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Greenwald joins Bill to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.

3. Shouting Fire: Stories from the Edge of Free Speech (73 mins)
What political guarantees must a society possess in order to truly enjoy freedom of expression? Do Americans ever benefit by limiting the scope of the First Amendment? This program examines those questions, focusing on case studies that weigh free speech against other societal influences. These include the backlash against University of Colorado professor Ward Churchill’s musings on imperialism in U.S. policy; principal Debbie Almontaser’s forced resignation from New York’s first Arabic-English public school due to her alleged terrorist sympathies; inappropriate or excessive restraint against protestors at the 2004 Republican National Convention; and the suspension of a San Diego high schooler for wearing a “Homosexuality Is Shameful” t-shirt.

2. Regional Realism—American Passages: A Literary Survey (27 mins)
Set in the antebellum American South, but written after emancipation, Mark Twain’s novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remains a classic of American literature. This program compares Twain’s depiction of Southern vernacular culture to that of Charles Chestnutt and Kate Chopin, and in doing so, introduces the hallmarks of American Realism.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for August is:

Map of the world with an orange background1. Explaining Globalization (55 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

Top 5: Films on Demand, April 2016

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Ruling by the Book: Illuminations: The Private Life of Kings (60 mins)
Dr. Janina Ramirez unlocks the secrets of illuminated manuscripts that were custom-made for kings and explores the medieval world they reveal. She begins her journey with the first Anglo-Saxon rulers to create a united England, she views the Liber Regalis at Westminster Abbey, encounters books in the British Library’s Royal manuscripts collection which are over a thousand years old, and examines a royal family tree which is five meters long.

4. The Road to Freedom: Gandhi (52 mins)
In the final episode, Mishal Husain explores the dramatic last years of Gandhi’s life, which culminated in his death by an assassin’s bullet. She gets to the bottom of an enduring mystery—why is Gandhi revered as Father of the Nation, when India turned its back on Gandhi’s blueprint for the country? Mishal retraces Gandhi’s visit to England in 1931 and uncovers evidence that Gandhi may have unwittingly contributed to the eventual partition of India. Newsreel footage from the time captures Gandhi meeting the people of Lancashire and London’s East End, and Tony Benn recalls meeting him as a six-year-old boy. Sixteen years later, India is free, but by then Gandhi is a broken man: sidelined from the center of power and devastated by partition and the horrific violence that independence brings. But it is Gandhi’s darkest hour that finally brings his greatest triumph.

3. The First Europeans: Migrations from Africa (54 mins)
Out of the great cradle of Africa came several waves of prehistoric hominid populations, some venturing into the Middle East while others crossed land bridges into Spain. This program shows how, over millennia, these nomads laid the groundwork for a permanent human presence in Europe. From La Caune de l’Arago in France to Britain’s Boxgrove cliffs to a Hungarian riverbank where Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans may have intermingled, the film explores stone tool innovations, shelter technology, burial practices, and early art and craft examples through which we can trace the emerging dominance of Homo sapiens on the continent. Portions in other languages with English subtitles. Part of the series The First Europeans.

2. Cooperative Learning and Culture: The Effective Teacher (46 mins)
Award-winning educator, author, and lecturer Harry K. Wong, in this classic video presentation, describes his method for teaching students how to work in cooperative groups. Dr. Wong believes effective teachers begin a lesson with a motivator—or attention-grabber—related to the lesson and designed to pique students’ curiosity. Research shows that the most effective learning in the classroom is in support groups. By teaching students to work cooperatively in groups, you prepare them for tomorrow’s world. Through cooperative group work, students learn to be self-motivated, self-directed, and procedure-oriented. Effective teachers create a classroom culture while effective administrators create a school culture. Students are taught procedures that allow for the smooth and efficient functioning of a classroom/school. These procedures establish the culture or shared values of the classroom/school. When you walk into a classroom/school with culture, you can sense the unity and purpose—a sense of belonging. Part of the series The Effective Teacher.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for April is:

fod-apr161. Save Our History: The Underground Railroad (92 mins)
The Underground Railroad was arguably the most important activist movement in American history, a loose network of people bound together by conscience and a determination to topple the institution of slavery by helping slaves escape to the North. “Conductors” risked fines and imprisonment for their devotion to the cause of freedom; “passengers” risked their lives. Hosted by Alfre Woodard, this program traces the hazardous journey undertaken by countless slaves, showing how they were guided—and pursued—along the way. Historical documents, visits to significant sites, and the rich music of the period are featured, as well as interviews with the descendants of noted abolitionists and commentary from experts including Ed Rigaud, president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

Top 5: Films on Demand, February 2016

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. The Time Has Come 1964–1966: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985 (56 mins)
After a decade-long cry for justice, a new sound is heard in the civil rights movement: the insistent call for power. Malcolm X takes an eloquent nationalism to urban streets as a younger generation of black leaders listens. In the South, Stokely Carmichael and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) move from “Freedom Now!” to “Black Power!” as the fabric of the traditional movement changes.

4. Workplace Leadership (13 mins)
Why do some people make great leaders, and are they born or made? These are just some of the questions explored in this program. Individuals in all kinds of situations and positions can provide real leadership if they have the opportunity and the desire to do so. This video explores the effort and determination required to get ahead in various fields.

3. Comic Books and African-Americans (55 mins)
Early comic book portrayals of African-Americans were usually demeaning. “Negro Romance” reflects an effort to portray blacks favorably to whites. Orrin Evans reflected the other side of a larger debate, creating “All-Negro Comics” with black characters for black audiences.

2. Haiti and Dominican Republic: An Island Divided—Black in Latin America, with Henry Louis Gates Jr. (52 mins)
In the Dominican Republic, Professor Gates explores how race has been socially constructed in a society whose people reflect centuries of intermarriage, and how the country’s troubled history with Haiti informs notions of racial classification. In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves’ hard-fought liberation from Napoleon Bonaparte’s French empire became a double-edged sword.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for February is:

fod-feb161. Nurturing Leadership (34 mins)
Are leaders born, or made? This video shows that while certain personality traits may influence leadership abilities, there are also leadership qualities that can be learned and nurtured. Business leaders, politicians, coaches and others share their perceptions of what it takes to be a leader, relating to viewers that observing certain principles and adopting admirable behaviors can help develop leadership attributes. Integrity, honesty, dependability and the belief in an organization’s core values are showcased, along with the elements necessary to create a culture of excellence. A basic definition of leadership as the action of leading a group of people toward a common goal is the preface to the importance of creating a vision of the future—the true mark of a leader. Listening, teamwork, motivation and the ability to engage others in a cause are also presented as leadership qualities. Many modern-day or historical capsules of leadership bring to life the concept of developing the traits to become a leader.

Top 5: Films on Demand, May 2015

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Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. North Korea: Secret Nation (18 mins)
This undercover report documents the stark poverty and extreme repression in North Korea that exist alongside spectacular cultural events and age-old customs unfettered by political ideology. Posing as a tourist, broadcast journalist Janet Choi risked arrest to get an inside look at one of the planet’s most secretive-and brutally totalitarian-countries while under surveillance by a police “tour guide.” Archival footage, an interview with a defector, and commentary by Dr. Daniel Pinkston and Timothy McCarthy, both of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, provide additional insights into the country’s history, culture, military posture, and living conditions.

4. Aspects of Melody (5 mins)
Can you sing it? A certain melody, that is. This Chat examines different types of melodies, on the spectrum from simple to complex. Part of the Discovery Orchestra Chat series.

3. Fighting Back 1957–1962: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985 (60 mins)
States’ rights loyalists and federal authorities collide in the 1957 battle to integrate Little Rock’s Central High School, and again in James Meredith’s 1962 challenge to segregation at the University of Mississippi. Both times, a Southern governor squares off with a U.S. president, violence erupts—and integration is carried out.

2. Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (52 mins)
Frantz Fanon’s two major works, Black Skin, White Masks (1952) and The Wretched of the Earth (1961), were pioneering studies of the psychological impact of racism on both colonized and colonizer. This program explores the preeminent theorist of anti-colonialism, integrating the facts of Fanon’s brief but eventful life with his long and tortuous inner journey. Interviews with family members and friends, documentary footage, readings from Fanon’s work, and dramatizations of crucial moments in his life are woven together, while cultural critics Stuart Hall and Françoise Verges provide historical context for Fanon’s philosophies.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for March is:

1. TEDTalks: Elyn Saks—A Tale of Mental Illness…from the Inside (15 mins)
“Is it okay if I totally trash your office?” It’s a question Elyn Saks once asked her doctor, and it wasn’t a joke. A legal scholar, in 2007 Saks came forward with her own story of schizophrenia—a condition controlled by drugs and therapy yet ever-present. In this powerful TEDTalk, she asks us to see people with mental illnesses clearly, honestly, and compassionately.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 5: Films on Demand, March 2015

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Many Tongues Called English, One World Language (52 mins)
This program explores how America’s rise as an economic power made it the driving force behind the spread of English in the 20th century. A world tour illustrates how English has mixed with other languages-from “Franglais” in France to “Singlish” in Singapore-and how the dollar’s power, coupled with the lure of consumerism, has made English the international trade language. Bringing it full circle, host Melvyn Bragg returns to the British Isles to survey English as it is spoken there now, measuring the influence of American slang and vocabulary from other languages.

4. V. S. Naipaul: The Enigma of Writing (53 mins)
In this program, novelist V. S. Naipaul, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Literature, explores the relationship between a writer and his work, offering insights into his life, his career, and his subtly incisive novel/memoir The Enigma of Arrival. In particular, he contrasts the inspiration of living in the English countryside with the Caribbean, Indian, and African influences that dominate his earlier writings. Excerpts from Miguel Street, A House for Mr. Biswas, and other books-read by actor Roshan Seth and by Naipaul himself-round out this engaging interview.

3. Seeds of Change: A Case Study of Sustainable Development in China (48 mins)
After surviving an emergency crash-landing, Dr. Sam Chao resolved to do something that would make a difference in the world. This award-winning program follows the outcome of his resolution: ECO, the Ecological Conservancy Outreach fund. Donating his life savings to the project, Dr. Chao enlists his childhood friend, Dr. Larry Wang, to clean up the Yangtze River and its tributaries, ravaged by erosion due to deforestation. As the video shows, sustainable ecological improvement must be linked to economic improvement for farmers whose very lives hang in the balance of such plans. Filmed largely in China’s Yunnan province, Seeds of Change visits the farmers who switch from growing crops on the riverbanks to forest-based agriculture.

2. Diversity in the Workplace: Playing Your Part (23 mins)
In workplaces, as in any other part of society, people are diverse. They come from different cultures and may have different belief systems, values, and religions. There is also diversity in interpersonal styles, mental ability, sexual orientation, age, and ways of thinking and learning. Using dramatized scenarios, this program shows how a wide range of personnel can work together successfully. Topics covered include the scope of diversity, responding sensitively, knowing the guidelines, communicating appropriately, and building on diversity.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for March is:

1. Creative Healing in Mental Health: Art and Drama in Assessment and Therapy (50 mins)
Art enables even those with little or no language to express themselves more fully and to project aspects of themselves that can be otherwise hard for therapists to intuit. This program guides mental health clinicians through the process of effectively utilizing art and drama in patient assessment and treatment. The video explains how to design a playful, nonjudgmental setting for these therapies, suggesting materials such as toys, masks, and costumes along with art supplies, and providing strategies to enhance creativity. Considerations of what to offer based on clinical goals are followed by demonstrations of how to invite patients to safely reflect on their artistic process.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 5: Films on Demand, January 2015

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Racial Stereotypes in the Media (42 mins)
Although demeaning and offensive racial stereotypes were pervasive in popular media of every kind during the 20th century, most observers would agree that the media is much more sensitive to representations of race today. But the pernicious effects of that stereotyping live on in the new racism arising from disparities in the treatment of stories involving whites and people of color in a ratings-driven news market, media-enhanced isolationism as a result of narrowcasting, and other sources. This program examines the relationship between mass media and social constructions of race from political and economic perspectives while looking at the effects media can have on audiences.

4. Black Panther/San Francisco State: On Strike (34 mins)
This two-part program begins with the actual film the Black Panther Party used to promote its cause. Shot in 1969 in San Francisco, it’s an exemplar of 1960s activist filmmaking, featuring an interview from jail with Black Panthers cofounder Huey Newton, as well as footage of cofounder Bobby Seale explaining its Ten Point Program and Eldridge Cleaver discussing the Panthers’ appeal to the black community. The program’s second part, shot by students and their supporters during the San Francisco State University strike of 1968–1969, documents the groundbreaking protest that led to the establishment of the first ethnic studies department at an American university.

3. The Constitution and Foundations of Government (26 mins)
Why do written documents figure so prominently in the early history of the United States? There are plenty of explanations, but they all boil down to the philosophical ideas that drove the American colonies to declare their independence—and a profound awareness that those ideas should be inseparable from the rule of law. This program explores the origins, outbreak, and outcome of the American Revolution, the major political texts which grew out of that struggle, and their ongoing significance today. Topics include the heavy British taxation that helped spark the Revolution; the spirit and structure of the Declaration of Independence; the short-lived Articles of Confederation; the drafting and ratification of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights; and their implications for U.S. government as we know it today. A viewable/printable instructor’s guide is available online.

2. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for January is:

1. The Great Depression (31 mins)
A part of the series America in the 20th Century. From the collapse of the stock market on October 29, 1929—Black Tuesday—to the many federal initiatives designed to revive the faltering U.S. economy, this program offers an insightful overview of life during the Great Depression. The presidential administrations of Herbert Hoover and FDR; the New Deals and their effects on labor, conservation, and cultural life; the Dust Bowl; and the Hawley-Smoot Tariff Act are discussed.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Eyes on the Prize Series

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The landmark PBS series Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954-1985 has been added to the Films on Demand collection. Winner of numerous Emmy Awards, a George Foster Peabody Award, an International Documentary Award and a Television Critics Association Award, Eyes on the Prize is the most critically acclaimed documentary on civil rights in America. It traces the civil rights movement from the Montgomery bus boycott to the Voting Rights Act. Julian Bond, political leader and civil rights activist, narrates.

1. Awakenings 1954–1956: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Individual acts of courage inspire black Southerners to fight for their rights: Mose Wright testifies against the white men who murdered young Emmett Till, and Rosa Parks refuses to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama.

2. Fighting Back 1957–1962: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
States’ rights loyalists and federal authorities collide in the 1957 battle to integrate Little Rock’s Central High School, and again in James Meredith’s 1962 challenge to segregation at the University of Mississippi. Both times, a Southern governor squares off with a U.S. president, violence erupts—and integration is carried out.

3. Ain’t Scared of Your Jails 1960–1961: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Black college students take a leadership role in the civil rights movement as lunch counter sit-ins spread across the South. “Freedom Riders” also try to desegregate interstate buses, but they are brutally attacked as they travel.

4. No Easy Walk 1961–1963: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
The civil rights movement discovers the power of mass demonstrations as the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. emerges as its most visible leader. Some demonstrations succeed; others fail. But the triumphant March on Washington, D.C., under King’s leadership, shows a mounting national support for civil rights. President John F. Kennedy proposes the Civil Rights Act.

5. Mississippi—Is This America? 1963–1964: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Mississippi’s grass-roots civil rights movement becomes an American concern when college students travel south to help register black voters and three activists are murdered. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party challenges the regular Mississippi delegation at the Democratic Convention in Atlantic City.

6. Bridge to Freedom 1965: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
A decade of lessons is applied in the climactic and bloody march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. A major victory is won when the federal Voting Rights Bill passes, but civil rights leaders know they have new challenges ahead.

7. The Time Has Come 1964–1966: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
After a decade-long cry for justice, a new sound is heard in the civil rights movement: the insistent call for power. Malcolm X takes an eloquent nationalism to urban streets as a younger generation of black leaders listens. In the South, Stokely Carmichael and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) move from “Freedom Now!” to “Black Power!” as the fabric of the traditional movement changes.

8. Two Societies 1965–1968: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) come north to help Chicago’s civil rights leaders in their nonviolent struggle against segregated housing. Their efforts pit them against Chicago’s powerful mayor, Richard Daley. When a series of marches through all-white neighborhoods draws violence, King and Daley negotiate with mixed results. In Detroit, a police raid in a black neighborhood sparks an urban uprising that lasts five days, leaving 43 people dead. The Kerner Commission finds that America is becoming “two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal.” President Lyndon Johnson, who appointed the commission, ignores the report.

9. Power! 1967–1968: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
The call for Black Power takes various forms across communities in black America. In Cleveland, Carl Stokes wins election as the first black mayor of a major American city. The Black Panther Party, armed with law books, breakfast programs, and guns, is born in Oakland. Substandard teaching practices prompt parents to gain educational control of a Brooklyn school district but then lead them to a showdown with New York City’s teachers’ union.

10. The Promised Land 1967–1968: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Martin Luther King stakes out new ground for himself and the rapidly fragmenting civil rights movement. One year before his death, he publicly opposes the war in Vietnam. His Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) embarks on an ambitious Poor People’s Campaign. In the midst of political organizing, King detours to support striking sanitation workers in Memphis, where he is assassinated. King’s death and the failure of his final campaign mark the end of a major stream of the movement.

11. Ain’t Gonna Shuffle No More 1964–1972: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
A call to pride and a renewed push for unity galvanize black America. World heavyweight champion Cassius Clay challenges America to accept him as Muhammad Ali, a minister of Islam who refuses to fight in Vietnam. Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C., fight to bring the growing black consciousness movement and their African heritage inside the walls of this prominent black institution. Black elected officials and community activists organize the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana, in an attempt to create a unified black response to growing repression against the movement.

12. A Nation of Law? 1968–1971: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Black activism is increasingly met with a sometimes violent and unethical response from local and federal law enforcement agencies. In Chicago, two Black Panther Party leaders are killed in a pre-dawn raid by police acting on information supplied by an FBI informant. In the wake of President Nixon’s call to “law and order,” stepped-up arrests push the already poor conditions at New York’s Attica State Prison to the limit. A five-day inmate takeover calling the public’s attention to the conditions leaves 43 men dead: four killed by inmates, 39 by police.

13. The Keys to the Kingdom 1974–1980: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
In the 1970s, antidiscrimination legal rights gained in past decades by the civil rights movement are put to the test. In Boston, some whites violently resist a federal court school desegregation order. Atlanta’s first black mayor, Maynard Jackson, proves that affirmative action can work, but the Bakke Supreme Court case challenges that policy. This film contains offensive language.

14. Back to the Movement 1979–Mid 1980s: Eyes on the Prize—America’s Civil Rights Movement 1954–1985
Power and powerlessness. Miami’s black community—pummeled by urban renewal, a lack of jobs, and police harassment— explodes in rioting. But in Chicago, an unprecedented grassroots movement triumphs. Frustrated by decades of unfulfilled promises made by the city’s Democratic political machine, reformers install Harold Washington as Chicago’s first black mayor.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 5: Films on Demand, October 2014

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Toxic Sediments (5 mins)
While the Sydney Harbor is as blue and sparkling as ever, beneath the surface lurks a dark menace that is eliminating as much as 40% of the invertebrate population. The levels of dioxins in fish from Sydney Harbor are now so high that even eating just one in an entire year is enough to put you in danger. In this video segment, meet geochemist Gavin Birch and hear about his investigation of this problem.

4. Toni Morrison: A Writer’s Work (52 mins)
Toni Morrison exists in two worlds: the visible world, bustling around her, and the world of her novels, whose characters tell about an interior reality hidden from the eyes of strangers. In her work, Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison has transported millions of readers into the experience of being black in America and confronting the realities of race. In this program with Bill Moyers, Morrison discusses the characters in her work, the people in her life, the power of love, and how the invented world of fiction connects to life.

3. Town Meeting with Nelson Mandela (75 mins)
Ted Koppel moderates a town meeting with Nelson Mandela at the City College of New York, on Mandela’s visit to the U.S. At the time of this visit, apartheid remains in place, but Mandela’s ANC is negotiating with de Klerk’s South African government. A major focus to the discussion is whether the U.S. should reward de Klerk for concessions to help him deal with his right-wing, or keep maximum pressure on. Another is whether Mandela is right to support Arafat, Gaddafi, and Castro.

2. Civil War Letters, Lindbergh-Sikorsky Fabric, African-American Comic Book: History Detectives (60 mins)
Did the makers of a certain 1950s comic book have more than romance on their minds? How do the signatures on a patch of fabric connect Charles Lindbergh to another first in flight? And what do some letters reveal about a racially charged massacre on a Civil War battlefield? History Detectives investigates.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for October is:

1. Haiti and Dominican Republic: An Island Divided—Black in Latin America, with Henry Louis Gates Jr. (60 mins)
In the Dominican Republic, Professor Gates explores how race has been socially constructed in a society whose people reflect centuries of intermarriage, and how the country’s troubled history with Haiti informs notions of racial classification. In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves’ hard-fought liberation from Napoleon Bonaparte’s French empire became a double-edged sword.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 5: Films on Demand, August 2014

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Marbury v. Madison (30 mins)
Who determines what the Constitution means: the Supreme Court, Congress, or the President? This 1803 case established the judiciary’s authority to interpret the Constitution. Marshall’s insistence on the principle of “judicial review” of acts of Congress brought him into conflict with President Thomas Jefferson, but established the court’s responsibility.

4. Birth of a Language (52 mins)
Melvyn Bragg begins the story of English in Holland, finding ancestral echoes in the Frisian dialect. What follows is a chapter on survival as the English language weathers Viking and Norman invasions, vying with and eventually absorbing rival tongues. Lively settings such as village pubs and markets bring home the lasting influence of Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, and Old French. The connection between Christianity, Latin, and an alphabet is explored, as well as the role of the language’s first champion, King Alfred the Great. Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney reads from and discusses the first epic in English, Beowulf.

3. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

2. Black Is…Black Ain’t (87 mins)
Is there an essential black identity? In this documentary, acclaimed filmmaker Marlon Riggs explores the diversity of African American lifestyles and cultural expressions, even as many speakers bare their pain at having been called “too black,” or conversely, “not black enough.” Riggs brings viewers face-to-face with African-Americans young and old, rich and poor, rural and urban, gay and straight, while offering a powerful critique of sexism, homophobia, and colorism within the black community. Includes performances by choreographer Bill T. Jones and poet Essex Hemphill and commentary from noted cultural critics Angela Davis, bell hooks, Cornel West, and others.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for August is:

1. Black Panther/San Francisco State: On Strike (34 mins)
This two-part program begins with the actual film the Black Panther Party used to promote its cause. Shot in 1969 in San Francisco, it’s an exemplar of 1960s activist filmmaking, featuring an interview from jail with Black Panthers cofounder Huey Newton, as well as footage of cofounder Bobby Seale explaining its Ten Point Program and Eldridge Cleaver discussing the Panthers’ appeal to the black community. The program’s second part, shot by students and their supporters during the San Francisco State University strike of 1968–1969, documents the groundbreaking protest that led to the establishment of the first ethnic studies department at an American university.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian