UPDATE: Integrated Library System and Catalog

We are now using our new Integrated Library System (ILS). While our implementation has gone well, we have had some expected issues. We are currently receiving expedited project support from our University System of Georgia team and the vendor through the end of June. We are confident these identified problems will be resolved quickly. Thank you very much for your patience as we all become familiar with our new tools.

The CSU Catalog and GIL Express Catalog have merged into a single Catalog. Simply change the drop down menu from Clayton State University to University System of Georgia to find titles owned by other universities.

We are ready to help you find the resources you need. If you encounter any issues or need assistance, please visit us at your convenience or contact us http://clayton.libanswers.com

UPDATE: Catalog changes coming in May

Earlier this year we notified you about an upgrade to our Integrated Library System (ILS). The implementation process is now in full-swing and the finish line is in sight. As a reminder, the most noticeable effect of this project will be a new look to our catalog.

On May 26th, all links for the CSU Catalog and GIL Express Catalog will redirect to a unified interface. An additional feature of the new system is the ability to personalize your search experience by signing in with your Loch ID.

Below are upcoming key dates for our implementation:

4/24 – 5/26 Library catalog becomes read-only and no new items will be added to the collection.

5/5 – 5/26 GIL Express requests suspended

5/19 – 6/6 Patron records become read-only and will require manual update when needed. Please allow additional time to borrow materials.

5/22 – 5/25 Circulation becomes read-only and all item borrowing will be manual. Please allow additional time to borrow materials.

5/26 Migration complete. Everything works exactly as it should. 🙂

We look forward to providing you with improved ways to access our materials. However, with a project this big, issues will occur. Thank you for your patience as we look forward to improving our service to each of you.

To stay up-to-date on developments with this project, follow the Clayton State Library blog at: https://claytonstatelibrary.wordpress.com, and don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions or concerns: library@clayton.libanswers.com

 

Catalog Changes Coming in May

Along with other libraries in the University System of Georgia, Clayton State is in the final stages to implement a new Integrated Library System (ILS). An Integrated Library System is a fancy name for what we use to keep track of the items we own and who has them checked out. For patrons of our library, the most noticeable effects of this project will be a new interface to our catalog. On May 26th the CSU Catalog http://gilfind.clayton.edu and GIL Express Catalog http://gilfinduc.usg.edu will be redirected to our new combined catalog interface.

gilfindcatalog

Implementation updates:

  • Upon implementation, we are excited to announce that our patrons will be able to utilize their Loch ID (same credentials used on the SWAN) to manage their Library Account, GIL Express Requests, and a personalized search experience. Say good bye to your 5-digit PIN.
  • GIL Express will continue to operate, however, a short pause may occur in service. Interlibrary loan will continue to operate during any lapse in service. Please plan accordingly if you need resources from other libraries for your summer semester courses or research projects.
  • Training is currently in planning stages. We will share more information soon, but you can expect the training to begin in late April 2017.

Library staff recently attended a 3 day workshop to become more familiar with the new ILS and catalog interface. We continue testing workflow scenarios and data to insure this transition goes as smoothly as possible. However, with a project this big, issues will occur. Thank you for your patience as we work to improve our service to each of you.

To stay up-to-date on developments with this project, follow the Clayton State Library blog at: https://claytonstatelibrary.wordpress.com, and don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions or concerns: library@clayton.libanswers.com

October Featured Resource: Mergent Online

Mergent Online provides company, industry, and country reports for active and inactive, public and some private companies. It includes company overviews, financial statements, stock information, SEC reports, news headlines, annual reports, tear sheets, and competitor/industry analysis.

Search:

  • by company symbol or name
  • D&B 20 Million Plus private companies
  • SEC & SEDAR filings by company, filing date, ranges or filing types

oct16source

Fall Break Hours

Your fall break is here and we hope you will find some time to relax, but you may need to use these days off to get caught up or work ahead so our virtual library is always open 24/7, http://www.clayton.edu/library. We are open 9am – 6pm on Sunday, 10/9 and open reduced hours for Monday, 10/10 and Tuesday, 10/11 from 8am – 5pm.

puzzleharrypotter

If you need a break from studying, we have a 1,000 piece Harry Potter puzzle waiting to be put together on the lower level and a large collection of feature films in DVD or streaming for you to binge-watch.

If you have items to return, you can use the book drop near Jazzman’s or our courtyard entrance. We hope you have a restful break.

In the News: RN Named New NLM Director

On May 11, 2016 the National Institutes of Health (NIH) named Patricia Flatley Brennan RN, PhD, the new director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  Dr. Brennan began her service this August and will be publicly sworn in on September 12, 2016.  Dr. Brennan is the first woman and the first nurse to serve as Director of the NLM.  She was previously the Lillian S. Moehlman-Bascom Professor, School of Nursing and College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland was founded in 1836 and is the world’s largest biomedical library.  The NLM not only curates an enormous print collection but also manages PubMed/MEDLINE, a database of over 22 million article citations dating back to 1946. Nearly 6,000 journals are indexed in MEDLINE.

If you would like to know more about Dr. Brennan or find MEDLINE articles in full text, try these resources available from the Clayton State University Library:

Brennan, P.F., & Bakken, S. (2015). Nursing Needs Big Data and Big Data Needs Nursing.  Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 475(5), 477-484. doi:10.1111/jnu.12159

Travis, L., & Brennan, P.F., (1998). Information Science for the Future: An innovative nursing informatics curriculum.  Journal of Nursing Education, 37(4), 162-168. 

MEDLINE with Full Text at EBSCOhost

ProQuest Central Full Text Articles from Peer Reviewed Journals, Newspapers, and Trade Publications

Information available online:

Patricia Brennan, University of Wisconsin-Madison Directory

Wisconsin Institute of Discovery Bio of Dr. Brennan

Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan Appointed Director of the National Library of Medicine announcement from the NLM

In the News: Race, bias, and the police – scholarly resources

Last week, the campus community came together to share and process thoughts and feelings regarding recent events involving police related deaths of African American men and the violent aftermath. The event was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Counseling and Psychological Services, Campus Life, and the Department of Psychology.


flickr photo shared by Cayusa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC ) license

During Monday’s conversation, hosts and audience members discussed ideas and resources that we thought some of you would like to explore further. (Links open in a new window and may require authentication with your SWAN username and password.)

UPDATE: The Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment has published a special issue titled “Police shooting of unarmed African American Males: Implications for the individual, the family, and the community.” It is freely available to the public until August 31, 2016. Click here to access.

Race-based trauma
Also known as post-traumatic slave syndrome, race-based traumatic stress, this concept is based on the theory that racial discrimination can be experienced as psychological trauma. Below are some scholarly resources to explore this theory further. PRO TIP-> To continue the search, try different keyword combinations like “racial trauma” or (post AND slave AND syndrome)

Carter, R. T. (2007). Racism and psychological and emotional injury: Recognizing and assessing race-based traumatic stress. Counseling Psychologist, 35(1), 13-105.

DeGruy, J. (2005). Post-traumatic slave syndrome: America’s legacy of enduring injury and healing. Milwaukie, Oregon: Uptone Press. (Book available through GIL Express)

Hardy, K. V. (2013). Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma. Reclaiming Children & Youth, 22(1), 24-28.

Polanco-Roman, L., Danies, A., & Anglin, D. M. (2016). Racial discrimination as race-based trauma, coping strategies, and dissociative symptoms among emerging adults. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy.

Wilkins, E., Whiting, J., Watson, M., Russon, J., & Moncrief, A. (2013). Residual effects of slavery: What clinicians need to know. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 35(1), 14-28.

Police training and use of force
Representatives from Campus Safety discussed officer training protocols and techniques they use to prevent violence and combat bias. Here are some reports and examples from the literature about police training and conduct. PRO TIP-> Try using these keywords in your own searches: police, training, “law enforcement officer”, “community policing”, “racial bias”

Crime and Police Conduct (Short report from CQ Researcher explores the question “Is a national crime wave starting?”)

Police Tactics: Has U.S. law enforcement become militarized? (Full report from CQ Researcher)

Police Brutality (Issues & Controversies analysis of the question: Do U.S. police departments use appropriate force when dealing with the public?)

Correll, J., Hudson, S. M., Guillermo, S., & Ma, D. S. (2014). The Police Officer’s Dilemma: A Decade of Research on Racial Bias in the Decision to Shoot. Social & Personality Psychology Compass, 8(5), 201-213.

Hopkins, K. (2015). “Deadly force” revisited: Transparency and accountability for D.C. police use of force. National Lawyers Guild Review, 72(3), 129-160.

Sozer, M. A., & Merlo, A. V. (2013). The impact of community policing on crime rates: does the effect of community policing differ in large and small law enforcement agencies?. Police Practice & Research, 14(6), 506-521.

Implicit Bias
Implicit bias
refers to the automatic and involuntary biases we experience as a result of a lifetime of direct and indirect messaging about ourselves and others. We may not be aware of our own implicit biases, and they may be in direct conflict with our deeply held beliefs. PRO TIP-> Try these keywords for more articles like the ones below: “social bias”, “racial bias”, “implicit attitudes”, “implicit association”, “implicit bias”

Project Implicit – Harvard University Discover your own implicit associations by participating in Project Implicit. Multiple online tests measure the strength of automatic associations between concepts (like black people or women) and value judgments (like “bad” or “clumsy”).

Ito, T. A., Friedman, N. P., Bartholow, B. D., Correll, J., Loersch, C., Altamirano, L. J., & Miyake, A. (2015). Toward a comprehensive understanding of executive cognitive function in implicit racial bias. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108(2), 187-218.

Marks, D. L. (2015). Who, me? Am I guilty of implicit bias?. Judges’ Journal, 54(4), 20-25.

van Nunspeet, F., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (2015). Reducing implicit bias: How moral motivation helps people refrain from making ‘automatic’ prejudiced associations. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 1(4), 382-391.

Data and Statistics
Last but not least, we want to share with you some resources on finding reliable data about these issues. We’ve compiled a list of sources for statistics on the Statistical Resources for Assignments! LibGuide. See the Crime & Justice tab for resources related to this topic. Additionally, here are some government reports related to police use of force.

Banks, D., Couzens, L., & Planty, M. (2015). Assessment of coverage in the Arrest-Related Deaths program. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249099). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Hyland, S., Langton, L., & Davis, E. (2015). Police use of nonfatal force, 2002–11. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249216). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

National Institute of Justice. (1999). Use of force by police: Overview of national and local data (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 176330). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Where to go next
If you would like help or more suggestions for researching any of these or other topics, please consult a librarian. We are accessible via phone, email, instant message, or text. Find us here: http://clayton.libanswers.com/

If you are experiencing any feelings of anxiety, depression, or grief as a result of these events or you would like someone to talk to process any feelings you may have, please contact Counseling and Psychological Services for support or referral.

Summer 2016 Break and Semester Hours

We maintain our regular semester hours throughout finals, but as soon as you hit submit on that last multiple choice or short answer question, we will convert to our semester break hours. Then we’ll start all over when the summer semester begins on May 21. See below for specifics on opening and closing hours as well as when we’ll close for holidays and special occasions.

Library Summer Hours

May 10 – May 20
Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 9am – 6pm

May 21 – July 25
Mon – Thur 8am – 9pm
Friday 8am – 6pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 12pm – 9pm

July 26 – August 14
Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 9am – 6pm

The library will be CLOSED on the following days:
Thursday, May 19
Monday, May 30
Monday, July 4

We wish you all a warm and relaxing summer break and a productive and rewarding semester. We hope you’ll come by for a visit. We’ll be here!