Top 10: Films on Demand, March 2014

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. The Summer of Love: 1967 (33 mins)
The “Summer of Love” is remembered today through a haze of nostalgia, hindsight, and hype. But how was the emergence of the youth counterculture actually covered at the time? In this program, selections from the NBC News archives offer an insightful look at the beginning of a cultural shock wave that is still being felt and debated today. Reporter Aline Saarinen offers a reality check as she covers the scene in Haight-Ashbury, while Hugh Downs talks with LSD advocate Timothy Leary and Jack Perkins reports on the prevalence of drugs in the hippie culture.

9. The American Transcendentalists: Concord, Massachusetts (54 mins)
The ideas and ideals of three American Transcendentalists—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller—initially given expression through The Dial continue to shape the discourse of literature, philosophy, and religion worldwide. This program, hosted by James H. Bride II and divided into eight chapters, traces the origins and defines the concept of Transcendentalism. It also spotlights key landmarks in and around Concord, where the Transcendental movement began, while profiling Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller in depth through readings, interviews, and dramatizations from significant Transcendentalist texts. Scholarly commentary is provided by Richard Baker, Lawrence Buell, Burnham Carter, Philip McFarland, Joan von Mehren, Joel Myerson, Wesley Mott, Robert Richardson Jr., and David Reynolds. Several dramatic passages are reenacted by Jeffrey Hyatt as Thoreau at Walden Pond.

8. Taking Credit: Understanding Loans, Credit Cards, and Other Debts (26 mins)
Some people have a hard time qualifying for a loan, while others can walk into a bank empty-handed and leave with thousands of dollars in credit. The same goes for credit cards—although most consumers carry several, for an unfortunate few they are out of reach. But no matter how easy or difficult it is to borrow money, one thing is certain: paying it back is the real challenge. This program helps high school and college-level viewers understand the basics of financial credit systems, the best ways to obtain and manage credit, and how credit decisions can influence one’s future. Focusing on credit cards, car loans, student loans, and mortgages, the program offers lighthearted dramatizations that first illustrate good and bad borrowing and spending habits—and then highlight discipline as the key to a great credit rating and sustained financial health. Students will also encounter the four Cs of lending: capacity, credit, capital, and collateral.

7. Buddhism (27 mins)
sing architecture and art, this program studies the birth of Buddhism in India and its spread to other lands where it has flourished. The Mahabodhi Temple, in Bodh Gaya; the Great Stupa at Sanchi, India; the Borobudur Temple—the largest Buddhist shrine in the world—in Indonesia; and the Chuang Yen Monastery in New York state, with its 37-foot-tall marble statue of The Enlightened One surrounded by 10,000 smaller statues, are featured.

6. Rethinking the Death Penalty (22 mins)
Some mistakes are fixable. Wrongful conviction and subsequent execution is not. In this program, ABC News correspondent John Donvan traces the history of the death penalty in the U.S. since 1935 while capturing the views of George W. Bush and Illinois governor George Ryan. Then, Gerald Kogan, former chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, and Dudley Sharp, director of Justice for All, join anchor Chris Wallace to discuss the use of DNA evidence to overturn death penalty convictions and to debate whether America’s criminal justice system is functioning or failing.

5. Race on Trial (23 mins)
Does the American justice system treat people differently based on their race? In this ABC News program, correspondent Michel Martin reports on the startlingly disparate outcomes of two almost identical drug-related cases tried one after another in a Boston court. In one case, the judge sentenced an African-American defendant with no prior record to prison time on the insistence of the prosecution. In the other case, the prosecution asked for a sentence of drug rehabilitation as opposed to prison time for a white defendant with prior convictions. This provocative program offers a timely assessment of an unfortunately recurring problem in American courtrooms.

4. The Medicated Child (60 mins)
The increase in the use of antipsychotic drugs is directly tied to the rising incidence of one particular diagnosis-bipolar disorder. Experts estimate that the number of kids with the diagnosis is now over a million and rising. But are antipsychotic drugs safe for young children? How early in a child’s life can mental illness be accurately detected? Is medication really the answer? With the debate over the drugging of America’s youth growing more intense, this Frontline episode confronts psychiatrists, researchers, and government regulators about the risks and benefits of prescription drugs for troubled children.

3. A Question of Color (56 mins)
“I am a black American woman from an interracial background. I look white, I identify myself as black,” says filmmaker Kathe Sandler. “I made this film because I wanted to understand something that had a very dominant influence in my life.” In this documentary, Sandler digs into the often subconscious world of colorism, a caste system within the African-American community that deems the lightest skin tones to be the most beautiful and socially acceptable. Tackling a painful and taboo subject with great sensitivity, the film helps viewers understand the complex interplay between racial identity, culture, and self-image.

2. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data. Host Amy and her friend Matt the Magician guide viewers through the need to make probability statements, and along with a team of students, use juggling skills to explore choice of test. Setting significance levels, tests of difference, the sign test, degrees of freedom, Yates correction, expected frequencies, parametric tests, and plastic interval scales are explored.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for March is:

1. Cooperative Learning and Culture: The Effective Teacher (46 mins)
Award-winning educator, author, and lecturer Harry K. Wong, in this classic video presentation, describes his method for teaching students how to work in cooperative groups. Dr. Wong believes effective teachers begin a lesson with a motivator—or attention-grabber—related to the lesson and designed to pique students’ curiosity. Research shows that the most effective learning in the classroom is in support groups. By teaching students to work cooperatively in groups, you prepare them for tomorrow’s world. Through cooperative group work, students learn to be self-motivated, self-directed, and procedure-oriented. Effective teachers create a classroom culture while effective administrators create a school culture. Students are taught procedures that allow for the smooth and efficient functioning of a classroom/school. These procedures establish the culture or shared values of the classroom/school. When you walk into a classroom/school with culture, you can sense the unity and purpose—a sense of belonging.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

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Top 10: Films on Demand, February 2014

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. By River, By Rail: History of the Black Migration (22 mins)
In the early 20th century, blacks moved north in hope of a better life with little more than a prayer and the shirts on their backs. In this program, poet Maya Angelou, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, and a host of other African-Americans recount the story of the migration, of separated families, and of the hardships, prejudice, and struggle for acceptance in the North that resulted in disillusionment. Black luminaries include James Cameron, author of A Time of Terror; Jacob Lawrence, artist and creator of The Black Migration series; and Dr. Julius Garvey, son of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and the Back to Africa movement of the 1920s.

9. Black Is…Black Ain’t (87 mins)
Is there an essential black identity? In this documentary, acclaimed filmmaker Marlon Riggs explores the diversity of African American lifestyles and cultural expressions, even as many speakers bare their pain at having been called “too black,” or conversely, “not black enough.” Riggs brings viewers face-to-face with African-Americans young and old, rich and poor, rural and urban, gay and straight, while offering a powerful critique of sexism, homophobia, and colorism within the black community. Includes performances by choreographer Bill T. Jones and poet Essex Hemphill and commentary from noted cultural critics Angela Davis, bell hooks, Cornel West, and others.

8. Native American Religions (28 mins)
In this program, Dennis Wholey has a conversation about Native American religions with Suzan Shown Harjo, executive director of The Morning Star Institute in Washington, D.C. Topics of discussion include the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978; some common aspects of the approximately 300 remaining Native American religions being practiced in the U.S. today; the concepts of a supreme being and associated sacred beings as they exist in Native American culture; the prophecies of the Cheyenne prophet Sweet Medicine and the historical impact of North America’s settlers on the land’s indigenous peoples; and the pressing need for all Americans, non-native and native alike, to create a better future together.

7. A Question of Color (56 mins)
“I am a black American woman from an interracial background. I look white, I identify myself as black,” says filmmaker Kathe Sandler. “I made this film because I wanted to understand something that had a very dominant influence in my life.” In this documentary, Sandler digs into the often subconscious world of colorism, a caste system within the African-American community that deems the lightest skin tones to be the most beautiful and socially acceptable. Tackling a painful and taboo subject with great sensitivity, the film helps viewers understand the complex interplay between racial identity, culture, and self-image.

6. The Second American Revolution, Part 1 (57 mins)
For African-Americans, the 20th century was fraught with contrasts. There was the glowing promise of equality in the nation’s charters and there was the actual bigotry that shadowed and shrank that promise. In this program, Bill Moyers is joined by a distinguished couple who have long spoken for black aspirations—Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Together they re-create, in dramatic dialogue and often in original settings, the world of 20th-century black America, which was, in both its highs and lows, a world filled with signposts about America itself. This episode covers the African-American struggle from 1900 to 1920.

5. Slave Catchers, Slave Resisters (91 mins)
This A&E Special depicts the system of slave policing in America—enforced by militias, armed vigilante slave patrols, paid slave catchers, and federal law—and how escaped slaves and their supporters continued to struggle against overwhelming odds…and sometimes won.

4. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data. Host Amy and her friend Matt the Magician guide viewers through the need to make probability statements, and along with a team of students, use juggling skills to explore choice of test. Setting significance levels, tests of difference, the sign test, degrees of freedom, Yates correction, expected frequencies, parametric tests, and plastic interval scales are explored.

3. Who Owns America? Economic Crisis in the United States (58 mins)
The United States, the world’s strongest economic power, is also the world’s largest debtor nation. Will America’s ever-increasing trade imbalance and economic deficit trigger a global economic calamity? This program travels from East Coast to West via the Rust Belt to check the financial pulse of the nation-and to capture in images the reality of an economic system spinning out of control. Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, economists Paul Krugman and Mark Brenner, and Harvard’s Kenneth Rogoff as well as students buried in debt and skilled laborers who have lost their pensions give their points of view on topics such as the pernicious use of government debt to pay for tax cuts; the $4-billion-per-week war in Iraq; the off-shoring of mortgage debt to China; Wall Street’s love of lean production and its negative impact on the manufacturing sector; the unwelcome necessity of student loans in the face of a faltering job market; consumerism based on overextended lines of credit; and the steadily falling median income.

2. The Bill of Rights (69 mins)
It upholds freedom of speech and religion, guarantees a free press, grants the right to keep and bear arms, preserves the right of trial by jury, establishes states’ rights, and more. It’s the Bill of Rights. This program presents the ten key constitutional amendments that have defined the fundamental liberties that are the American birthright—and examines the controversies and challenges they have withstood.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for February is:

1. The Judicial Branch (21 mins)
September 24, 1789—the first United States Congress establishes the basic structure of the federal judiciary. With this act, the American legal system becomes an entity entwined with our fundamental notions of democracy and fair government, equal in power and authority to the executive and legislative branches. This program guides viewers through the history of the judiciary and illustrates how it works in theory and practice. Topics include the main purposes of the judicial branch—specifically, interpreting the law, determining if laws are unconstitutional, and applying the law to individual cases; the various divisions and levels of courts, such as lower, appellate, and specialized courts; the unique powers of the Supreme Court; summaries of famous Supreme Court cases; and more.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, January 2014

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Native American Religions (28 mins)
In this program, Dennis Wholey has a conversation about Native American religions with Suzan Shown Harjo, executive director of The Morning Star Institute in Washington, D.C. Topics of discussion include the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978; some common aspects of the approximately 300 remaining Native American religions being practiced in the U.S. today; the concepts of a supreme being and associated sacred beings as they exist in Native American culture; the prophecies of the Cheyenne prophet Sweet Medicine and the historical impact of North America’s settlers on the land’s indigenous peoples; and the pressing need for all Americans, non-native and native alike, to create a better future together.

9. The Phony War (58 mins)
It is 1938 and Chamberlain goes to Munich to bargain with Hitler for “peace in our time.” It was not to be. Instead, Hitler invades Czechoslovakia; Britain introduces conscription as trenches are dug and sandbags appear throughout London. Poland is invaded and Britain declares war. London evacuates its children and the British Expeditionary Force embarks for France. British shipping is being sunk, but this is nevertheless the “Phony War.” Blackouts are introduced and traffic accidents double. Churchill replaces Chamberlain. The BEF is routed in France and the disaster of Dunkirk becomes a miracle. De Gaulle flies to London as Paris falls.

8. Fractals: An Animated Discussion (63 mins)
Dazzling computer animation combined with the genius of Benoit Mandelbrot and Edward Lorenz present a captivating discussion of fractals and the fundamental concepts of fractal geometry-self-similarity and chaos. Mandelbrot uses a simple head of broccoli to demonstrate the complexity of fractals. Narrating over the three-dimensional animations, Mandelbrot discusses how fractals serve as an excellent model of irregular natural forms, such as coastlines, and how they relieve the scientist of the necessity of describing nature with simple geometric forms-clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones. The world of fractals is revealed, from the depths of the Mandelbrot set, to the Lorenz attractor.

7. Black Panther/San Francisco State: On Strike (34 mins)
This two-part program begins with the actual film the Black Panther Party used to promote its cause. Shot in 1969 in San Francisco, it’s an exemplar of 1960s activist filmmaking, featuring an interview from jail with Black Panthers cofounder Huey Newton, as well as footage of cofounder Bobby Seale explaining its Ten Point Program and Eldridge Cleaver discussing the Panthers’ appeal to the black community. The program’s second part, shot by students and their supporters during the San Francisco State University strike of 1968–1969, documents the groundbreaking protest that led to the establishment of the first ethnic studies department at an American university.

6. Why We Do What We Do (22 mins)
Beginning with a concise history of the media, this program explores the effects of TV and other information and entertainment sources on personal attitudes and actions as well as on public opinion. The impact of how appearance, language, and behavior are portrayed is considered. Tips on becoming a more critical viewer are included.

5. Sacred Spirit: The Lakota Sioux, Past and Present (51 mins)
This poignant collage features members of the Oglala Lakota Sioux living on and off the Pine Ridge reservation who present their unself-pitying yet pointed observations on Lakota history and modern-day Lakota life. Their creation myth and their attitudes toward Mother Earth and the concept of time contribute insights into their worldview, while footage of a major powwow and a tepee-raising offer glimpses of the people’s cultural heritage. Wounded Knee and the extermination of the buffalo are discussed. Gang violence, alcoholism, lack of employment, and housing and health problems are also addressed, as well as the many faces of subjugation.

4. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data. Host Amy and her friend Matt the Magician guide viewers through the need to make probability statements, and along with a team of students, use juggling skills to explore choice of test. Setting significance levels, tests of difference, the sign test, degrees of freedom, Yates correction, expected frequencies, parametric tests, and plastic interval scales are explored.

3. Black Is…Black Ain’t (45 mins)
Is there an essential black identity? In this documentary, acclaimed filmmaker Marlon Riggs explores the diversity of African American lifestyles and cultural expressions, even as many speakers bare their pain at having been called “too black,” or conversely, “not black enough.” Riggs brings viewers face-to-face with African-Americans young and old, rich and poor, rural and urban, gay and straight, while offering a powerful critique of sexism, homophobia, and colorism within the black community. Includes performances by choreographer Bill T. Jones and poet Essex Hemphill and commentary from noted cultural critics Angela Davis, bell hooks, Cornel West, and others.

2. Racial Stereotypes in the Media (42 mins)
Although demeaning and offensive racial stereotypes were pervasive in popular media of every kind during the 20th century, most observers would agree that the media is much more sensitive to representations of race today. But the pernicious effects of that stereotyping live on in the new racism arising from disparities in the treatment of stories involving whites and people of color in a ratings-driven news market, media-enhanced isolationism as a result of narrowcasting, and other sources. This program examines the relationship between mass media and social constructions of race from political and economic perspectives while looking at the effects media can have on audiences.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for January is:

1. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, December 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Genetically Modified Crops: Hope vs. Hype (22 mins)
This ABC News program begins with an overview of the controversial new type of crop hybridization known as genetic modification, exploring why the technology has panicked European consumers and has left many American farmers with mixed feelings. Then, correspondent John Donvan moderates a vigorous discussion between Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman; Val Giddings, Vice President of Food and Agriculture at the Biotechnology Industry Organization; and vociferous anti-biotechnology activist Jeremy Rifkin, who debate the value of government and industry testing and the need for package labeling.

9. Will Marriage Survive? (29 mins)
Topping a million per year, the number of divorces in the United States has tripled since 1960, and one in three babies in America today is being born to single parents. A growing body of evidence suggests that these trends are threatening the very fabric of society. Is it too late to infuse new life into a time-honored relationship? This program spotlights the efforts of those committed to saving and promoting the institution of marriage.

8. Caudillo: The History of the Spanish Civil War (110 mins)
A superb documentary, using much footage hitherto unknown. This is a program that presents both sides of this still-controversial subject in its own words and using its own footage. The result is a solid lesson in history, a moving testimonial to the valor and romanticism of young men, and an indispensable tool for understanding modern Spanish literature and history.

7. Unearthing Evil: Archaeology in the Cause of Justice (28 mins)
By grim coincidence, archaeologists are ideally suited by their conventional techniques to determine whether or not war crimes have been committed. This program looks at forensic archaeologist Richard Wright, whose work has greatly helped the international community in the pursuit of justice. The program shows details of his team’s findings at the Ukrainian village of Serniki, proving with such evidence as bullet manufacture and carbon dating that the SS had carried out the executions, not Stalin’s soldiers. Based on this work, Wright was asked by the UN to investigate 29 mass graves in Bosnia. The excavations helped convict the perpetrators of some of the most heinous ethnic cleansing in the Balkans.

6. La Disgregacion del Islam Andalusi y el Avance Cristiano-in Spanish with English Subtitles (53 mins)
From the death of Almanzor and the breakup of Moorish al-Andalus into taifas to Christian victory at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, this program depicts the continuous transformation of the Iberian Peninsula as rival powers shaped the land’s destiny. The alliances and struggles among Christians, Moors, Almoravides, and Almohads are captured through numerous dramatizations and maps. Key figures, including Alfonso VI and El Cid, are featured. Not available in French-speaking Canada.

5. Overcoming Children’s Language Problems: Speaking for Ourselves (24 mins)
Approximately 10% of children have some difficulties in learning to speak. This program explores how children learn to communicate and how parents can help their children overcome speech problems if they occur. It follows families as they work on their child’s speech and/or language skills in an institutional setting and at home; shows the challenges the children face in developing such social and physical skills as meeting new friends or learning new games; and explains the techniques for recognizing speech or language disorders, and why doing so is so important.

4. First Steps: Becoming Human—Unearthing Our Earliest Ancestors (60 mins)
In this episode, NOVA encounters “Selam,” the amazingly complete remains of a 3-million-year-old child packed with clues to why we split from the apes, came down from the trees, and started walking upright. Distributed by PBS Distribution. A part of the series Becoming Human.

3. End Game (45 mins)
This program captures the final days of the Second World War as the Third Reich comes to an end with a single gunshot and Imperial Japanese resistance collapses under the weight of two atomic bombs. Distributed by A&E Television Networks. A part of the series World War II in HD.

2. Essentials of Faith: Islam (24 mins)
The Five Pillars of Islam-belief in one God, praying five times a day, fasting, giving to charity, and going on pilgrimage-guide all Muslims. But cultural and political influences have shaped the observance of the faith in various ways from country to country. This program explores the beliefs of four Islamic leaders and scholars who communicate penetrating insights and observations on the contrasts and continuity within their religion. Interviewees include Imam Abdul Sajid of the Al-Hijrah Trust, chef and TV show host Michael Bukht, prominent London banker Kosser Sheikh, and Professor Haleh Afshar, a lecturer in politics and women’s studies at the University of York.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for December is:

1. Albert Camus, Journalist (52 mins)
Far from embracing the existentialism he is often associated with, Albert Camus was a social activist and staunch believer in the positive potential of the human race. In this program, excerpts from private film archives and a variety of interviews document Camus’s career as a journalist concerned with social justice. From his early years in Algeria writing about poverty and oppression to the underground newspaper he edited for the French Resistance, the video reveals how Camus’s journalism informed the themes and style of The Stranger, The Plague, and The Myth of Sisyphus.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, November 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Infectious Diseases: More Mobility, Greater Danger (31 mins)
Illustrating connections between globalization and the spread of disease, this program uses data-mapping to assess the potential impact of deadly viruses-including the much-feared and adaptable avian influenza. Outbreaks of bird flu in the Netherlands and West Nile virus in New York City illustrate the increasing mobility of exotic pathogens in an era of frequent international travel and dynamic global migration. Presenting detailed information on virus tracking and the horrific effects that many epidemics have on livestock as well as on people, this video illuminates a new front line in the battle between humans and their microscopic enemies.

9. Peter the Great (32 mins)
Emperor of All the Russias, Peter the Great launched the transformation of his nation from a medieval society into a Western-style European power. Expert analysis by Professor Lindsay Hughes, of London University’s School of Slavonic and Eastern Studies, and historian Dr. David Moon-plus lush dramatizations of Peter as a child and an adult-emphasizes his sweeping reforms in the areas of government, military science, industry, commerce, education, culture, and even religion. From Peter’s fascination with all things Western, to his convoluted ascension to the throne, to his victory in the Great Northern War, this program neatly sums up the fascinating life of one of European history’s most dynamic figures.

8. The National Parks: America’s Best Idea—A Film by Ken Burns—Part 3, “The Empire of Grandeur” (1915-1919) (114 mins)
In the early 20th century, America had a dozen national parks, but they were a haphazard patchwork of special places under the supervision of different federal agencies. This episode traces how the conservation movement pushed the government to establish one unified agency to oversee all the parks. This led to the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. Its first director, Stephen Mather, launched an energetic campaign to expand the NPS and attract more visitors. It was Mather who protected the Grand Canyon from encroaching commercial interests and established it as a national park, rather than a national monument. Part of the series The National Parks: America’s Best Idea.

7. The Worst Job in the World: The Bhangis of India (28 mins)
Indoor plumbing is rare in rural India. This program introduces viewers to two Dalit families who, for generations, have cleaned the excrement from their villages’ open-air latrines with their bare hands. But flush-toilets don’t necessarily free untouchables from their role; a young man who manually removes waste from the sewers of Hyderabad is also interviewed, along with Bezawada Wilson-a hereditary latrine cleaner-turned-activist determined to free all Bhangis from what is arguably the worst job in the world. Wilson interjects a lone ray of hope into what is otherwise a depiction of a singularly bleak way of life. Some content may be objectionable.

6. Medicine: Ancient Discoveries (50 mins)
We often think of modern medicine as only really beginning at the Renaissance—but we’re wrong. The Edwin Smith Papyrus is an ancient textbook on surgery that dates back to about 1600 BC. It is full of details on the examination, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of numerous ailments. This film looks into the grisly but brilliant surgeries of the great ancient physicians to witness three procedures common at the time but which would not be attempted successfully again for nearly 2,000 years.

5. Kids Behind Bars (29 mins)
Too young to drive, but old enough to kill. What happens to children convicted of felonies? How and where are they incarcerated? Can they be helped? And does their punishment really fit their crimes? In this program, judges, legal counsel, law enforcement officers, academic experts from Emory and Rutgers Universities, the Director of the Institute for Minority Health Research, and others examine the trend in the U.S. toward trying children as adults and discuss efforts being made to understand their violent behavior.

4. Essentials of Faith: Islam (24 mins)
The Five Pillars of Islam-belief in one God, praying five times a day, fasting, giving to charity, and going on pilgrimage-guide all Muslims. But cultural and political influences have shaped the observance of the faith in various ways from country to country. This program explores the beliefs of four Islamic leaders and scholars who communicate penetrating insights and observations on the contrasts and continuity within their religion. Interviewees include Imam Abdul Sajid of the Al-Hijrah Trust, chef and TV show host Michael Bukht, prominent London banker Kosser Sheikh, and Professor Haleh Afshar, a lecturer in politics and women’s studies at the University of York.

3. Religion in Hindu India (53 mins)
From ritual ablutions to ceremonial cremation, the religious life of a Hindu is intimately associated with the spiritual properties of water and fire. This program steps off the beaten path for a journey with two sadhus as they visit holy locales, witness religious rites, and, in general, immerse themselves in Hindu culture as it is exists in the religion’s motherland, India. The Festival of Shivaratri, in Benares, and the Festival of Holi, in Mathura, are featured, along with devotional and secular activities in Allahabad that follow the official conclusion of the Kumbh Mela. Contains nudity associated with Nagas, male warrior ascetics.

2. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for November is:

1. Supply and Demand: Christmas, a Case Study (50 mins)
In the industrialized world, Christmas means megabucks to the businesses that can create a fad or spot a trend. Filmed from a U.K. perspective, this program illustrates the annual scramble of key holiday-related industries-toys, video games, music CDs, luxury items, Christmas trees, and holiday foods-to catch the seasonal wave and ride it to high profits. But which products within each category will capture shoppers’ attention? The dynamics of-and glitches in-the global supply and demand cycle are thoroughly covered, factoring in the effects of brands, product licensing, advertising, research and development, and offshore manufacturing.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, October 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. The Alzheimer’s Mystery (48 mins)
This program traces the century-long initiative to understand the disease first described by Dr. Alois Alzheimer. Patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s and family members discuss how they cope with the illness, while medical professionals address the disease’s pathology, research toward a cure, and the importance of compassionate healthcare. No longer stigmatized as senile, patients are sympathetically viewed as victims of an insidious disease that is reaching epidemic proportions.

9. Exploring Vegetarianism: A Healthy Alternative (19 mins)
Am I a vegetarian if I don’t eat meat but I do eat fish? Can I still have milk and be a vegetarian? What about eggs? These are just some of the questions answered in this comprehensive video about a popular but often misunderstood subject. Terms like vegan, ovo-lacto vegetarian, and ovo vegetarian are clearly defined. Vegetarians offer firsthand information on which foods provide all the necessary vitamins, minerals, and other nutritional supplements to keep our bodies healthy. And we take a look at breakfast, lunch, dinner, and maybe a few snacks, from a vegetarian perspective.

8. James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket (87 mins)
James Baldwin was at once a major 20th-century American author, a civil rights activist, and a prophetic voice calling Americans, black and white both, to confront their shared racial tragedy. This film biography of Baldwin’s life captures the passion of his beliefs with stirring excerpts from his novels and striking archival footage dating from the Harlem Renaissance through to the author’s commentary on civil rights to his writing retreats in Istanbul and Europe. Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, and William Styron provide insight as the program skillfully links excerpts from Baldwin’s major works to different historical stages in black-white dialogue.

7. Solomon Northup’s Odyssey: Twelve Years a Slave (117 mins)
To be a free man and a man with a trade was a lot to be proud of for a black man in 19th-century America. Solomon Northup was such a man. Then, one fateful day, his good life and all his dreams came to a crashing halt. Solomon Northup was kidnapped and carried off into slavery to serve on plantations in the South. For 12 long years he experienced the cruelty and subjugation that was slavery. Under any circumstances, it’s a harrowing story. Under most circumstances, it would be a story worth telling. Under these circumstances, it is a story that needs to be told. For the story of Solomon Northup is a true story.

6. Eight Million Gods: The Japanese Matsuri Festival (21 mins)
This program examines the Japanese matsuri or “summer festival,” perhaps the best elucidation of that country’s ancient polytheism. Ceremony footage from Tokyo and surrounding areas illustrates various festival activities and explores the Japanese cultural emphasis on community, cooperation, and folk worship. Commentary by Japanese cultural scholar Yoshi Morikatsu, interviews with festival participants, and astonishing crowd scenes of matsuri processions make clear that Japan derives a strong sense of unity from these communal celebratory rituals.

5. Derek Walcott: The Poetry of Place (53 mins)
Hailed as one of the finest living poets writing in English, Derek Walcott grew up on an island where French, French patois, and Creole are also spoken. Filmed on St. Lucia, Walcott’s birthplace and the wellspring of his poetic vision, this program presents the biography of a major figure in contemporary literature. The poet talks about his childhood and education, his influences and techniques, and how he actually started out as a painter. Matched with beautifully filmed segments of the island and its people, Walcott reads selections of his poetry, including passages from his epic Omeros.

4. V. S. Naipaul: The Enigma of Writing (53 mins)
In this program, novelist V. S. Naipaul, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Literature, explores the relationship between a writer and his work, offering insights into his life, his career, and his subtly incisive novel/memoir The Enigma of Arrival. In particular, he contrasts the inspiration of living in the English countryside with the Caribbean, Indian, and African influences that dominate his earlier writings. Excerpts from Miguel Street, A House for Mr. Biswas, and other books-read by actor Roshan Seth and by Naipaul himself-round out this engaging interview.

3. Derek Walcott (30 mins)
Derek Walcott was born a British subject on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia and studied English in school almost as a second language. In the language of great poets and literature, this winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature also discovered the tongue of political mastery: a culture imposed by white foreigners. This contradiction he confronts in both his poetry and his life, spending half the year in what he calls the prehistoric Eden of his childhood, and the other half teaching in the world’s newest empire, the U.S. In this program with Bill Moyers, Walcott discusses the power of his words and the recurring themes of the black struggle in his work.

2. Investigative Reports: Prime Time Violence (45 mins)
This episode of Investigative Reports asks: does violence on television cause violence in the home and on the streets? Distributed by A&E Television Networks.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for October is:

1. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, September 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. A Fatal Contradiction—Freedom: A History of US (30 mins)
The Declaration of Independence stated “all men are created equal,” but the nation’s slaves were a glaring exception. The colonial slave trade and brutal life for African-Americans on Southern plantations spark the abolition movement and the Underground Railroad. This episode explores the role of Frederick Douglass, and then looks at the impact of the Lincoln-Douglas debates on the westward expansion of slavery. It ends with Abraham Lincoln’s election to the presidency.

9. Stress: Portrait of a Killer (56 mins)
Over the last three decades, science has been advancing the understanding of stress—how it impacts the human body and how social standing can make a person more or less susceptible. Through studies of baboons on the plains of Africa and research in the neuroscience labs of Stanford University, scientists are discovering just how lethal stress can be. Understanding how stress works can help people figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. As Stress: Portrait of a Killer shows, stress is not just a state of mind; it’s something measurable and dangerous.

8. War of the Sexes: Power and Leadership (45 mins)
The war of the sexes, like any war, needs leaders and followers. Using a military-style competition between male and female test subjects, this program examines the different ways in which men and women exercise power, set goals, construct hierarchies, and perform teamwork. A chain of command, incorporating clearly defined roles and responsibilities, quickly materializes among the male participants-while the women appear less equipped to implement rigid organization. But the program shows that a female-centric system, in which authority figures emerge only after a period of familiarization and mutual affirmation, proves more effective for satisfying the contest’s requirements.

7. Hindu Temples (25 mins)
Hindu temples are models of the Hindu universe. And while no two temples are exactly alike, they do share some common architectural features. This video compares modern Hindu temples in North America to the classic northern- and southern-style Indian temples of a thousand years ago. Elements that have survived the centuries-the sikhara tower and the statues of the myriad manifestations of the universal spirit, Brahman-are illustrated alongside more recent aspects of temple architecture, like the assembly hall and the om symbol, in Hindu theology the sound of creation. The concepts of karma and moksha are also touched upon.

6. English in America (52 mins)
When Massasoit hailed the Plymouth settlers in their own language, they might have taken it for a sign that English would dominate the New World. Packed with surprising etymologies and intriguing stories, this program traces the dynamic relationship between English and America, exploring the linguistic influence of westward expansion, cowboy culture, slave culture, and encounters with the French and Spanish languages. Key works examined include The New England Primer and Webster’s The American Spelling Book.

5. Birth of a Language (52 mins)
Melvyn Bragg begins the story of English in Holland, finding ancestral echoes in the Frisian dialect. What follows is a chapter on survival as the English language weathers Viking and Norman invasions, vying with and eventually absorbing rival tongues. Lively settings such as village pubs and markets bring home the lasting influence of Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, and Old French. The connection between Christianity, Latin, and an alphabet is explored, as well as the role of the language’s first champion, King Alfred the Great. Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney reads from and discusses the first epic in English, Beowulf.

4. Racial Stereotypes in the Media (42 mins)
Although demeaning and offensive racial stereotypes were pervasive in popular media of every kind during the 20th century, most observers would agree that the media is much more sensitive to representations of race today. But the pernicious effects of that stereotyping live on in the new racism arising from disparities in the treatment of stories involving whites and people of color in a ratings-driven news market, media-enhanced isolationism as a result of narrowcasting, and other sources. This program examines the relationship between mass media and social constructions of race from political and economic perspectives while looking at the effects media can have on audiences.

3. Why We Do What We Do (22 mins)
Beginning with a concise history of the media, this program explores the effects of TV and other information and entertainment sources on personal attitudes and actions as well as on public opinion. The impact of how appearance, language, and behavior are portrayed is considered. Tips on becoming a more critical viewer are included.

2. Unearthing Evil: Archaeology in the Cause of Justice (28 mins)
By grim coincidence, archaeologists are ideally suited by their conventional techniques to determine whether or not war crimes have been committed. This program looks at forensic archaeologist Richard Wright, whose work has greatly helped the international community in the pursuit of justice. The program shows details of his team’s findings at the Ukrainian village of Serniki, proving with such evidence as bullet manufacture and carbon dating that the SS had carried out the executions, not Stalin’s soldiers. Based on this work, Wright was asked by the UN to investigate 29 mass graves in Bosnia. The excavations helped convict the perpetrators of some of the most heinous ethnic cleansing in the Balkans.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for September is:

1. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, August 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Alice Walker (33 mins)
“Being black, being a woman, and being a writer is just the most wonderful challenge. It’s like having three eyes, three hearts, rather than one,” says the author of The Color Purple in this profile, as she relives her journey from an impoverished childhood in rural Georgia to the peace and creativity of her present life in northern California. Alice Walker describes how the Civil Rights movement transformed her life, defines her concept of “womanism,” and explains her recurrent theme of a woman’s recovery of wholeness through resistance to racism and sexism.

9. The Language of Empire (52 mins)
“Amok,” “boomerang,” “bungalow,” “bangle,” “dumdum,” “plonk,” “assassin”-these are some of the many words that have entered English by way of colonial expansion. This program explores how the British Empire in its heyday exported its language around the globe and how different forms of speech and vocabulary, as well as different attitudes to English, developed out of that colonial expansion. Rich variations of dialect, accent, and slang are heard in many samples from India, the Caribbean, and Australia.

8. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

7. Unearthing Evil: Archaeology in the Cause of Justice (28 mins)
By grim coincidence, archaeologists are ideally suited by their conventional techniques to determine whether or not war crimes have been committed. This program looks at forensic archaeologist Richard Wright, whose work has greatly helped the international community in the pursuit of justice. The program shows details of his team’s findings at the Ukrainian village of Serniki, proving with such evidence as bullet manufacture and carbon dating that the SS had carried out the executions, not Stalin’s soldiers. Based on this work, Wright was asked by the UN to investigate 29 mass graves in Bosnia. The excavations helped convict the perpetrators of some of the most heinous ethnic cleansing in the Balkans.

6. Racial Stereotypes in the Media (42 mins)
Although demeaning and offensive racial stereotypes were pervasive in popular media of every kind during the 20th century, most observers would agree that the media is much more sensitive to representations of race today. But the pernicious effects of that stereotyping live on in the new racism arising from disparities in the treatment of stories involving whites and people of color in a ratings-driven news market, media-enhanced isolationism as a result of narrowcasting, and other sources. This program examines the relationship between mass media and social constructions of race from political and economic perspectives while looking at the effects media can have on audiences.

5. Why We Do What We Do (22 mins)
Beginning with a concise history of the media, this program explores the effects of TV and other information and entertainment sources on personal attitudes and actions as well as on public opinion. The impact of how appearance, language, and behavior are portrayed is considered. Tips on becoming a more critical viewer are included.

4. The Common School: 1770–1890 (55 mins)
In the aftermath of the Revolution, a newly independent America confronted one of its most daunting challenges: how to build a united nation out of 13 disparate colonies. This program profiles the passionate crusade launched by Thomas Jefferson and continued by Noah Webster, Horace Mann, and others to create a common system of tax-supported schools that would mix people of different backgrounds and reinforce the bonds of democracy. A wealth of research illustrates how this noble experiment—the foundation of the young republic—was a radical idea opposed from the start by racial prejudice and fears of taxation.

3. English in America (52 mins)
When Massasoit hailed the Plymouth settlers in their own language, they might have taken it for a sign that English would dominate the New World. Packed with surprising etymologies and intriguing stories, this program traces the dynamic relationship between English and America, exploring the linguistic influence of westward expansion, cowboy culture, slave culture, and encounters with the French and Spanish languages. Key works examined include The New England Primer and Webster’s The American Spelling Book.

2. Birth of a Language (52 mins)
Melvyn Bragg begins the story of English in Holland, finding ancestral echoes in the Frisian dialect. What follows is a chapter on survival as the English language weathers Viking and Norman invasions, vying with and eventually absorbing rival tongues. Lively settings such as village pubs and markets bring home the lasting influence of Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, and Old French. The connection between Christianity, Latin, and an alphabet is explored, as well as the role of the language’s first champion, King Alfred the Great. Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney reads from and discusses the first epic in English, Beowulf.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for August is:

1. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, July 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Public Relations (28 mins)
Since the first written account of public relations–like activities in ancient Greece, PR professionals have been on record as shapers and reshapers of public opinion. This program defines the role of public relations, differentiating it from advertising, and examines the way in which PR operates. In addition, industry professionals discuss the contributions of Ivy Lee and the founder of modern PR, Edward L. Bernays; the role of public relations in America’s two world wars; the shamefully successful Lucky Strike cigarettes campaign to make smoking in public fashionable for women; and the Ad Council and public service announcements. Crisis intervention is examined, as in the well-handled case of the tainted Tylenol scare, and the botched damage control of the Exxon Valdez disaster.

9. Overcoming Harassment (19 mins)
Sexual, racial, and other forms of harassment are steadily on the rise. This practical program looks at the effects on individuals and the organization of continued harassment while providing easy-to-follow techniques for dealing with perpetrators.

8. The Age of Anxiety (1945–1969) (76 mins)
With the end of the Second World War, the cultural period W. H. Auden named the Age of Anxiety had begun—a time characterized by an intensifying fear of nuclear Armageddon as the Iron Curtain fell across Europe and the Cold War spread across the globe. This program examines the evolution of the British novel during the period 1945–69, spotlighting J. R. R. Tolkien, William Golding, Iris Murdoch, Kingsley Amis, John Braine, Alan Sillitoe, George Lamming, Sam Selvon, Colin MacInnes, Ian Fleming, John le Carré, Doris Lessing, John Wyndham, Anthony Burgess, J. G. Ballard, and Margaret Drabble as well as some of their key works.

7. Struggling with Life: Asperger’s Syndrome (14 mins)
In this program, ABC News correspondent Jay Schadler reports on that neurological disorder, which makes normal interactions with peers virtually impossible. Studies conducted by Yale University’s Fred Volkmar shed light on both the compulsive fixations and the difficulties in comprehending facial expressions that characterize Asperger’s patients.

6. AIDS: A Biological Perspective (30 mins)
Why is a cure so elusive? Why has it been so difficult to find a cure or vaccine for AIDS? What makes AIDS so deadly? What is the HIV virus, and how does it devastate the immune system? This eye-opening video explores these questions, providing fascinating insights into the unique qualities of the HIV virus that make AIDS such a relentless killer.

5. Asperger Syndrome (3 mins)
Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Hans Asperger labeled this disorder “autistic psychopathy” in 1944. The exact cause is unknown. More than likely, an abnormality in the brain is the cause of Asperger syndrome. Genetic factors may play a role, since the disorder tends to run in families. A specific gene has not been identified.

4. Top Gun: Video Gaming Obsession and Addiction (43 mins)
When the Crisps confiscated their teenage son Brandon’s Xbox, they never expected him to run away from home…or to die from injuries sustained while in hiding. Using Brandon’s story as a case study, this program delves into the growing psychological problems of video game obsession and addiction. Interviews with Brandon’s parents and best friend, a family therapist whose patient list includes video gamers, and a psychologist who pushed the video gaming industry to adopt a ratings system provide insights into the obsessive and addictive aspects of video gaming.

3. Peter Jennings Reporting: Breakdown-America’s Health Insurance Crisis (42 mins)
One of the last documentaries from ABC News journalist Peter Jennings, this program untangles a particularly complex problem: the rapidly growing number of Americans who lack health care coverage. With characteristic thoroughness, Jennings searches out specific reasons for the weakening and potential collapse of employer-subsidized health insurance. America’s rising median age, medical advances that have increased the use of health services, and a broad spectrum of economic factors are all explored. Interviews with doctors, hospital administrators, corporate leaders, scholars, and everyday working people highlight what’s at stake for American businesses and employees.

2. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for July is:

1. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian

Top 10: Films on Demand, June 2013

filmsondemand

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following top 10 titles:

10. Carlos Fuentes—in Spanish with English Subtitles (26 mins)
Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes offers insights into the writing of his book La Región más Transparente, the Boom and Latin American literature, the elevated importance of writers living under dictatorship, his identity as a speaker of Spanish, and the organic unity of the Spanish language.

9. When God Was a Girl: Divine Women (50 mins)
Traveling across the Mediterranean and Near East to some of the world’s oldest sacred places, in this program Bettany Hughes finds evidence that women were part of the very birth of organized religion.

8. The Human Element (47 mins)
This program explores ways for organizations to harness diversity and original thinking, unlocking the innovator in every employee or team member. Expert guests include GE’s former CEO Jack Welch, Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, RLJ Companies founder Bob Johnson, and Procter & Gamble CTO Gil Cloyd. Also featured are Frans Johansson, author of The Medici Effect, and management guru Peter Sheahan.

7. Explaining Globalization (56 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

6. Racial Stereotypes in the Media (42 mins)
This program examines the relationship between mass media and social constructions of race from political and economic perspectives while looking at the effects media can have on audiences.

5. Trial by Jury (35 mins)
This video explores the origins of the jury trial, explains the jury’s crucial role in our judicial system, and introduces students to the courtroom and the process of a trial. The program is divided into the following sections: The History of Jury Trials; What Trial Juries Do; Who’s Who in the Courtroom; Qualifications for Jury Service; What Happens During a Trial; Alternatives to Jury Trials; The Grand Jury; and Pros and Cons of Jury Trials.

4. War of the Words: Divine Women (48 mins)
Was the period known as the Dark Ages in fact a golden age for women in religion? In this program, Bettany Hughes profiles some powerful medieval women and shows how religion, and the written word, was vital to their authority.

3. The Second American Revolution, Part 1 (57 mins)
In this program, Bill Moyers is joined by a distinguished couple who have long spoken for black aspirations—Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Together they re-create, in dramatic dialogue and often in original settings, the world of 20th-century black America, which was, in both its highs and lows, a world filled with signposts about America itself. This episode covers the African-American struggle from 1900 to 1920.

2. Inferential Statistics (36 mins)
Who said statistics were boring? Using magic and circus motifs, this program demonstrates the significance of probability theory and the importance of using the correct test to analyze research data.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for June is:

1. Unearthing Evil: Archaeology in the Cause of Justice (28 mins)
This program looks at forensic archaeologist Richard Wright, whose work has greatly helped the international community in the pursuit of justice. The program shows details of his team’s findings at the Ukrainian village of Serniki, proving with such evidence as bullet manufacture and carbon dating that the SS had carried out the executions, not Stalin’s soldiers. Based on this work, Wright was asked by the UN to investigate 29 mass graves in Bosnia. The excavations helped convict the perpetrators of some of the most heinous ethnic cleansing in the Balkans.

Got Questions? Ask a Librarian