Films on Demand: Recent Additions

Films on Demand is our online streaming media resource. We are highlighting some of the titles that were added to our subscription last month.

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  •  Public Speaking—Informative and Persuasive Speeches (35:17) – Learn different strategies for writing and delivering two types of speeches: persuasive and informative
  •  American Umpire (56:06) – This thought-provoking documentary about U.S. foreign policy chronicles how the United States became the world’s policeman and questions how long the U.S. must continue to play this role.
  •  Counter Histories: Rock Hill (28:08) – In a world grappling with issues of equality in all forms, the story of the Friendship 9 rings in our ears as powerfully as ever.
  • Marketing Strategy Case Studies: The Starbucks Experience (26:55) – This program looks at the role of acquisition, brand-stretching, social media, and new channel development in Starbucks’ success and considers criticisms of some of the company’s policies.
  • Project Greenglow and the Quest for Gravity Control (51:04) – This program explores science’s obsession with the idea of gravity control.
  • Should You Really Play Video Games? (51:42) – The film explores how developers engineer their games and the impact of gaming on behavior, physiology, and neurobiology.
  • Climate Change: The EPA Has Gone Overboard: A Debate (01:40:20) – Intelligence Squared US debate.
  • B.B King – Life of Riley (01:36:45) – Starting with his childhood on the plantations in Mississippi, it follows the struggles B.B. King has faced throughout his life, including prejudice and segregation.
  • Curing Alzheimer’s (50:13) – This film looks at the promising work on all fronts, from the scientists working on catching the disease at its earliest stages to the researchers working to understand the causes.
  • Great War Stories (51:16) – This moving film shows how the unfolding conflict of the First World War affected ordinary people caught up on the front line and on the home front.

Need additional multimedia resources? Use our LibGuides, http://clayton.libguides.com/multimedia, as a starting point.

February Featured Resource: Politics in America

Politics in America offers comprehensive, nonpartisan commentary and data about members of Congress. Detailed member profiles provide concise insight and candid analysis of personalities, political styles, legislative agendas, political ambitions, and reputations at home and on the Hill.

Coverage includes:

  • Editions 2000 (106th Congress) – 2016 (114th Congress)

Member profiles include:

  • Biographical data, committee assignments, election results, CQ Key Votes, interest group ratings, CQ Vote Studies, and contact information
  • Detailed descriptions of each member’s congressional district as drawn for that term of Congress, including updated maps and voting trends

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Advanced Search users can limit results by:

  • Edition (Congress)
  • State
  • Political Party
  • Chamber

Need additional resources for political science? Use our LibGuides, http://clayton.libguides.com/subject/politicalscience, as a starting point.

Tax Season: Forms and Assistance

Tax season has officially started, so it is time to gather together those important documents. We have collected helpful resources for filing both your state and federal taxes. Needing more tips? Subscribe to Tax Tips from the IRS to receive a tip via email each business day during the tax-filing season.


The College of Business sponsors VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) which provides free tax preparation on a first come first serve basis. The service is offered on Saturdays from 9am – 1pm in the College of Business building. Contact (678) 466-4527 for more information.

Clayton State University Resources
VITA @ Clayton State

Georgia Resources
Georgia Department of Revenue
Taxpayer Assistance Centers in Georgia

Federal Resources
IRS.gov – Internal Revenue Service
USA.gov – File Your Taxes
Tax eFile
Tax Information for Students — Higher Education
Tax Benefits for Education
Publication 501: Do I have to file a tax return?
1098 tax form

Social Media and Apps
IRS2Go: IRS-developed app for Android, Amazon, and iOs designed to help taxpayers check on the status of their refund, sign up for helpful tax tips or get the most recent IRS Twitter feeds
Twitter – IRS News: news, guidance for the public
YouTube – IRS: tax tips, identify theft, small business, IRS tax pros
Tumblr – IRS: tax tips, videos, podcasts and more

 

 

flickr photo shared by kenteegardin under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license

PACE – Library partnership pt. 3 of 3

This blog post features guest contributors Jordan Knight and Evelyn Tran, students in Dr. Margaret Fletcher’s Fall 2016 ENGL 1101 PACE class. To learn more about PACE, visit: http://clayton.edu/PACE.


In the News: Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

On the 13th of September, the Clayton State Library Department presented the Freedom Summer film which is one of a five-part film series in the Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle program. A large audience of students, professors, and community members were present to view the film, listen to the panel discussion, and participate in the open discussion which followed.

The film focuses on the struggles that African Americans had to endure during Freedom Summer of 1964 in Mississippi.  During this time African Americans were oppressed by Jim Crow laws such as literacy tests and poll taxes which kept them from voting. Civil rights activists like Fannie Lou Hamer and Robert “Bob” Moses as well as civil rights organizations such as the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) and SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), began hosting voter registration drives and local sit-ins to protest the unequal exclusion of minorities in the democratic voting process.

If you would like to learn more about the events and people highlighted in the film or the discussion, we suggest the following resources:

http://clayton.libguides.com/CreatedEqual/FreedomSummer (Event covered at Clayton State University).

http://crdl.usg.edu/events/freedom_summer/ (Civil Rights Digital Library – Freedom Summer)

Freedom Schools

Throughout the summer of 1964, Freedom Schools were opened in black communities to provide a richer educational experience than was offered in Mississippi public schools. African American children learned of their own heritage and the heroes such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass who fought for freedom and equal rights.  In addition they improved their basic skills such as reading and writing, which enabled them to better understand the historical movement that was taking place.  These schools allowed them to gain the knowledge and courage to become a force for change in their local communities. Some further readings on Freedom Schools include the following sources:

http://www.educationanddemocracy.org/ED_FSC.html  (Freedom School Curriculum website)

Adickes, S. (2005). Legacy of a Freedom School. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Electronic book available through GALILEO*

Emery, K. (2007). The lessons of Freedom Summer. Race, Poverty and the Environment, 14(2), 20-22. Available via JSTOR* or online open access.

Emery, K., Gold, L.R., and Braselman, S. (2008). Lessons from Freedom Summer: Ordinary people building extraordinary movements. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press. Available via InterLibrary Loan request.

Freedom Summer

From the achievements, the suffering, and the determination of civil rights activists during Freedom Summer, the Civil Rights Movement grew, and ultimately the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 radically changed the South to legally eliminate Jim Crow laws.

If you would like to learn more information about the influence and impact of Freedom Summer (1964), the Clayton State Library suggests the following resources:

Burrows, N., Helton, L.E., Levy, L.B., and McDowell, D.E. (2014). Freedom Summer and its legacies in the classroom. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 155-172.*

Edmonds, M. and Haller, S. (2014). Images from Freedom Summer, 1964. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 51-63.*

McDaniel, H. N. (2016). Growing up civil rights: Youth voices from Mississippi’s Freedom Summer. The Southern Quarterly, 53, 94-107.*

Norman, B. (2014). What are all these bodies doing in the River? Freedom Summer and the cultural imagination. The Southern Quarterly, 52, 173-178.*

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle was made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

For more information about the Created Equal program, please visit: http://createdequal.neh.gov.

We invite you to look forward to the upcoming A Place for All People poster exhibit which will be presented at Clayton State University Library in 2017. This artistic presentation will celebrate the opening of the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture by displaying A Place for All People, an exhibit of posters that exhibit the African American story through images of “pain and glory, power and civility, enslavement and freedom.” For more information about the future event, please visit the following link: www.sites.si.edu/exhibitions/exhibits/AfricanAmericanPosters/index.htm and stay tuned to the Clayton State Library blog.

 

PACE – Library partnership pt. 2 of 3

The following article was written by Evelyn Tran and Jordan Knight, students in Dr. Margaret Fletcher’s Fall 2016 ENGL 1101 PACE class and is the 2nd in a 3 part series of collaborative posts. See the first post here. To learn more about PACE, visit http://clayton.edu/PACE.


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

by: Evelyn Tran, Jordan Knight

Throughout the course of several decades, we, as a nation, have become disconnected from the history of our national consciousness/national identity. In order for our country to progress and strive to achieve true equality for all, it is extremely necessary that we learn to accept our past history, seek to gain a better understanding of others, and challenge ourselves to engage in open, honest conversations among our fellow peers. In the Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle program hosted by Clayton State University Library, the main focus was to analyze the adversities that African Americans had to endure.  The final program in the series, Freedom Summer, dealt with the struggle for minorities to gain the freedom to vote.

The Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle program has spanned to encompass over 130 years of American History through their community programs. In the five-part film series, the Freedom Summer event specifically focused on the importance of the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project and the immediate effects of Freedom Summer. The program, which consisted of panelists Dr. Jelani Favors, Mr. David Peña (in lieu of Dr. Joshua Meddaugh), and hostess Ms. Erin Nagel, showcased the Freedom Summer film as an opening, followed by a panel discussion between the students and panelists. The Freedom Summer film displayed the harsh reality of racial violence that African Americans had to endure across the United States.

Dr. Favors, Assistant Professor of History at Clayton State University, focused on the long legacy of education, democracy, and citizenship from Black Colleges to Freedom Schools through his interpretation of several civil rights activists, such as Herbert Lee and Fannie Lou Hamer. Dr. Favors’ initial goal concentrated on inspiring young activists to challenge themselves to learn about the “missing pages of American History and to have dialogue around American history. This dialogue, in turn, could lead to enlightenment and hopefully to civic engagement as well.” From this, he was able to inspire the audience to want to gain a voice within their local communities as well as a sense of appreciation for the impact that voter registration drive in Freedom Summer  left on American history.

Another panelist of the evening was Mr. Peña, Lecturer in Political Science, who exhibited Dr. Meddaugh’s (Professor and Coordinator of the Political Science program at Clayton State University) presentation, which concentrated on the State and Supreme Court’s reactions and decisions to the voting movements. It was through the Supreme Court’s decisions such as the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that the true struggles in the fight for basic human rights were highlighted. Additionally, Mr. Peña’s focus on the legal and political reaction to the African American movement allowed for students and professors to educate themselves from a different perspective. This scholarly approach allowed the attending individuals to understand and observe how the American educational system was manipulated in order to favor a white majority. On the other hand, for Dr. Meddaugh the Clayton State University event was key for students to comprehend and be aware of how America has become a more inclusive society. He stated that it was “a multitiered event that allows for the dissemination of information on the Civil Rights Struggle throughout the campus and throughout the community.” This was the key: Freedom Summer and the panel’s presentations provided the individuals who attended the opportunity to enhance their views on the historical events as well as focusing their attention on current day racism and discrimination.

Following the panelists’ presentation, the audience was given three questions to spark discussions among both the students and the panelists. One of the questions raised was the objective of the Freedom Summer organizers’ motive in prioritizing education and voting. The Freedom Summer Movement played a key role in addressing the racially segregated school systems through the creation of Freedom Schools. The main purpose of the creation of the Freedom Schools was to educate the black community on the idea of black empowerment which in turn led to a greater voice in political participation. From this, these individuals were able to gain political liberation by breaking the barriers imposed upon them by Jim Crow laws. Overall, the 1964 Freedom Summer Project was a stepping stone in expanding not only African Americans’ right to vote but also their education, a fundamental right which they had been deprived of throughout history.

In the Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle program, the panelists brought awareness to the concerns that modern society may face today, and the significant role that American history has played in defining equality in America. Education is the key to moving away from a racially profiled society. Even though the panelists had different approaches and tendencies towards activism and change, they all had one common goal: to end racism.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle was made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. For more information about the Created Equal program, visit http://createdequal.neh.gov.

PACE – Library partnership pt. 1 of 3

In the Fall of 2016, the Clayton State Library partnered with Dr. Margaret Fletcher’s ENGL 1101 class as part of PACE (Partnering Academics and Community Engagement), the university’s initiative to connect academic work with community engagement opportunities. Dr. Fletcher’s students attended the library’s film screening and discussion event, Freedom Summer, and conducted follow-up research on the events and people featured in the film and those discussed by the presenting scholars. In addition to course assignments, the products of this research include a visual display of the history of voting rights in America, an article summarizing the event, and blog post with recommended library resources for researchers. All artifacts will be featured here on the library blog.

Over the next week, we will highlight their contributions here to share the work of your fellow students.

Today, we are featuring the visual display. You can see it in person on the whiteboard in the Lower Level of the Library.

Visual depiction of the history of voting rights in America with

Constitutional amendments and Jim Crow laws related to voting and civil rights. Images and description of the Selma to Montgomery march and text from Dr. King's Letter From Birmingham Jail. Images and short biographies of individuals who died during the fight for Voting Rights in America: Rev. George Lee, James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Henry Schwerner, Jimmie Lee Jackson, Herbert Lee, Lamar Smith, Jonathan Myrick Daniels, Vernon Ferdinand Dahmer

Quote from Dr. Jelani Favors: "When we inspire people, we can't just inspire them to say 'I'll vote at the next presidential election,' but we have to look at local politics, local issues, and we’ve got to find a way to improve our immediate community: for students at Clayton State that means not just Morrow, not just Atlanta, but that means Clayton State as well. How can we improve Clayton State, make it more inclusive, make it speak to our dreams, our desires? The whole theme of this year and last year was ‘Dreams. Made Real,’ but what are those dreams? When we think of the Civil Rights Movement, of social movements, these were really predicated upon the idea of Freedom Dreams, wanting to aspire and move our nation towards a more free society. Well, we can have a more than just a free campus; what other interests do students have? We can actually make those interests come real through activism, engagement, dialogue, but also through learning, which is another important part. I cannot tell you how many times that I’ve spoken with or consulted with local activists, students who become engaged. I tell them it is important that you read so that you can arm yourselves with history, knowledge of what has taken place before you, and by doing so, you can see the missteps that people have made, you can understand the failures that they’ve encountered, you can also understand their successes. In doing so, we can create better and more effective forms of social activism even today.” Summaries of the effects of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 including increased voter turnout and greater diversity in Congress. Summary of the 2013 Shelby County vs. Holder decision which overturned key elements of the Voting Rights Act. After effects of the Holder decision included voting roll purges and increases in new restrictions in states previously covered by the Voting Rights Act.

Resources for 2017 MLK Day of Service

What are you doing for others? :: Martin Luther king day :: flickr photo by Takeshi Life Goes On shared under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license

 Are you looking for ways to celebrate the MLK Day of Service on January 16, 2017? In addition to the many titles we own, you can enjoy several streaming videos about Martin Luther King, Jr. including Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: The Making of a Holiday from our Films on Demand collection. The Civil Rights Digital Library delivers engaging online articles and multimedia related to the struggle for racial equality in the 1950s and 1960s and of course GALILEO @ Clayton State has articles, images, videos and the full text of the “I Have a Dream” speech.

The Clayton State Annual Dr. Martin Luther King (MLK), Jr. Celebration is a collaborative effort between the Department of Campus Life, AmeriCorps, Diversity Education Experiences for Peers (D.E.E.P.) Educators, the Tau Epsilon Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, CSU Student Chapter of the NAACP, and the Student African American Brotherhood (SAAB) to commemorate the life of Dr. King and significant events that occurred during the Civil Rights movement.

Jan. 13 – Jan. 16 — Cultural Immersion Trip to Washington, D.C.
Jan. 19— Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration, 7:00 pm, SAC Ballroom
More information about these events is available here.

You may also be interested in these activities and volunteer opportunities happening on MLK Day:

Check out these links for more cultural and service opportunities this Martin Luther King Day:

January Featured Resource: Something About the Author

Something About the Author is the preeminent source on authors and literature for young people. It covers the children’s classics like Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White, Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein, Matilda by Roald Dahl, and Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume. Read about the lives and works of authors and illustrators of literature for children and young adults.

Entries typically cover personal life, career, writings, adaptations, and additional sources. Autobiographical essays discuss the author’s career, interests and motivation, among other topics.

screenshot of the resource homepage with bullet list of resource features

Welcome to Spring semester

Welcome to Spring 2017It may be hard to call it “spring” with the frosty temperatures outside, but today marks the beginning of a new semester, and we’re excited to see what the new term has in store for us.

Some things we’re looking forward to are a revamped room reservation system and some exciting programming opportunities, like the Harry Potter exhibit coming in March. Stay tuned for more details.

We’re open 7 days a week, and have resources available 24 hours online at clayton.edu/library, so check us out and find what you’re looking for at the Clayton State University Library.

Launch of Improved Room Reservations System

Our group study rooms are one of the most popular features of the renovated library. They are the go-to spot for students wanting to work together on research, projects, presentations, and more. In response to student feedback and to increase efficiency, we are launching an improved Room Reservations system to help students identify the best room that matches their group’s needs and size. In addition, room availability is clear and easy to read from the new time grid.

time grid with 30 minute increments and horizontal rows for each room

The 12 group rooms are identified and grouped by room type:

Use any of the following to learn more about Room Reservations @ the Clayton State Library:

Reminders:

  • Groups must consist of at least 2 people
  • Reservations can be made up to 14 days in advance
  • Only 1 reservation per person, per day is allowed
  • Maximum reservation length is 3 hours

Learn how to find us in-person and online and ask us anything at http://clayton.libanswers.com