September Featured Resource: Issues & Controversies

Issues & Controversies helps researchers understand today’s crucial issues by exploring hot topics in business, politics, government, education and popular culture. Resources include: pro/con statements, timelines, primary sources & statistical tables and editorial cartoons & newspaper editorials.

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The Intelligence Squared U.S. Debate Series featuring some of the most prominent political figures, journalists, academics, and experts is included in Issues & Controversies. A searchable, interactive transcript is available for each debate and allows viewers to navigate to specific points in the debate using the predefined segments. Player controls (play/pause, volume, closed-captioning, and full-screen) are located beneath the player window.

Top 5: Films on Demand, August 2016

Films on Demand is an online streaming video subscription available to all Clayton State students. Last month users were busy watching the following titles:

5. Women First & Foremost (183 mins)
Hosted by Rita Moreno and Dee Wallace Stone. Volume 1: Remember the Ladies, Volume 2: Touching the Clouds with Pen and Plane, and Volume 3: A Lady in the Spotlight

4. Moyers & Company: Trading Democracy for “Security” (56 mins)
The violent Boston rampage triggered a government response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Greenwald joins Bill to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.

3. Shouting Fire: Stories from the Edge of Free Speech (73 mins)
What political guarantees must a society possess in order to truly enjoy freedom of expression? Do Americans ever benefit by limiting the scope of the First Amendment? This program examines those questions, focusing on case studies that weigh free speech against other societal influences. These include the backlash against University of Colorado professor Ward Churchill’s musings on imperialism in U.S. policy; principal Debbie Almontaser’s forced resignation from New York’s first Arabic-English public school due to her alleged terrorist sympathies; inappropriate or excessive restraint against protestors at the 2004 Republican National Convention; and the suspension of a San Diego high schooler for wearing a “Homosexuality Is Shameful” t-shirt.

2. Regional Realism—American Passages: A Literary Survey (27 mins)
Set in the antebellum American South, but written after emancipation, Mark Twain’s novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remains a classic of American literature. This program compares Twain’s depiction of Southern vernacular culture to that of Charles Chestnutt and Kate Chopin, and in doing so, introduces the hallmarks of American Realism.

and the number 1 Films on Demand video for August is:

Map of the world with an orange background1. Explaining Globalization (55 mins)
Everyone talks about globalization, but what does it really mean? And what are its implications for the average American? In this compilation of NewsHour segments, experts from the U.S. and abroad speak their minds on a shrinking world and an expanding global economy.

New Resource: American Fiction, 1774-1920

amfictionAmerican Fiction, 1774-1920 encompasses more than 17,5000 works of prose fiction written by Americans from the political beginnings of the United States through World War I, including thousands never before available online. This digital collection is based on authoritative bibliographies including Lyle H. Wright’s American Fiction: A Contribution Toward a Bibliography, widely considered the most comprehensive bibliography of American adult prose fiction of the 18th and 19h centuries, and Geoffrey D. Smith’s American Fiction, 1901-1925: A Bibliography, comprising nearly three-quarters of all adult fiction published in the United States during this time period.

Explore the development of American literature in a changing culture through novels, short stories, romances, fictitious biographies, allegories, travel accounts and sketches.

In the News: RN Named New NLM Director

On May 11, 2016 the National Institutes of Health (NIH) named Patricia Flatley Brennan RN, PhD, the new director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  Dr. Brennan began her service this August and will be publicly sworn in on September 12, 2016.  Dr. Brennan is the first woman and the first nurse to serve as Director of the NLM.  She was previously the Lillian S. Moehlman-Bascom Professor, School of Nursing and College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland was founded in 1836 and is the world’s largest biomedical library.  The NLM not only curates an enormous print collection but also manages PubMed/MEDLINE, a database of over 22 million article citations dating back to 1946. Nearly 6,000 journals are indexed in MEDLINE.

If you would like to know more about Dr. Brennan or find MEDLINE articles in full text, try these resources available from the Clayton State University Library:

Brennan, P.F., & Bakken, S. (2015). Nursing Needs Big Data and Big Data Needs Nursing.  Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 475(5), 477-484. doi:10.1111/jnu.12159

Travis, L., & Brennan, P.F., (1998). Information Science for the Future: An innovative nursing informatics curriculum.  Journal of Nursing Education, 37(4), 162-168. 

MEDLINE with Full Text at EBSCOhost

ProQuest Central Full Text Articles from Peer Reviewed Journals, Newspapers, and Trade Publications

Information available online:

Patricia Brennan, University of Wisconsin-Madison Directory

Wisconsin Institute of Discovery Bio of Dr. Brennan

Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan Appointed Director of the National Library of Medicine announcement from the NLM

World Breastfeeding Week resources

We are excited to highlight resources in support of World Breastfeeding Week, August 1st – August 7th. World Breastfeeding Week is sponsored by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action whose purpose is to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding worldwide. We believe we can contribute to this goal by educating ourselves and others, and we want to do just that.

For many mothers, breastfeeding can be overwhelming. It brings on a new set of challenges that add to the challenge of taking care of a newborn baby. Additional hurdles may appear when nursing moms return to work. Although breastfeeding can seem stressful, it does come with benefits for mom and baby.

Breastfeeding week provides us with the opportunity to share some of our scholarly resources that explore these challenges and benefits. We have chosen some of our favorite articles, videos, and books regarding breastfeeding and its importance to the health of mothers, their children, and their communities. (Electronic resources require a Clayton State username and password for off-campus access)

General Information on Infant Nutrition and Breastfeeding

  • The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. (1963). Physical book published by La Leche League International.
  • The Breastfeeding Sourcebook: Everything You Need to Know. (1996) Electronic book by Sara Rosenthal
  • Feeding Your Baby (streaming video)
    This program demonstrates breastfeeding positions and techniques, as well as breast milk storage. It also covers bottle feeding, choosing a formula, bottle and nipple care, and feeding techniques. (17 minutes)
  • Nutrition for Infants and Children (streaming video)
    This video explains the importance of good nutrition for newborns, infants, and toddlers and examines its beneficial effects on their growth and development. (26 minutes)
  • The Milky Way: Every Mother Has a Story (streaming video)
    This film looks at postnatal care, public policies, and cultural norms related to breastfeeding in the U.S. and Sweden. Experts explain the nutritional, physiological, immunological, and psychological benefits of breastfeeding for mother and child. (1:33:15)

Challenges and Overcoming Barriers to Breastfeeding
Mothers face physical, social, and emotional challenges to initiating and continuing breastfeeding. PRO TIP-> try these keywords for further research: breastfeeding, lactation, nursing, barriers, challenges, struggles, pain, social, emotion*, difficult*, attitude

Health Benefits
The articles below highlight a few of the health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and children. PRO TIP-> To narrow your search to specific benefits, try a mix of these search terms: breastfeeding, benefits, child, mother, outcomes, health, “mental health”, obesity, “oral health”

Sustainable Development
The 2016 theme for World Breastfeeding Week is “A Key to Sustainable Development”, seeking to raise awareness of the links between breastfeeding and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) identified by the United Nations in 2015. Learn more about the SDG’s here. PRO TIP-> use the Boolean operator “AND” to connect the keyword “breastfeeding” with a keyword from an SDG to continue searching. Examples: breastfeeding AND “clean water”; breastfeeding AND poverty

Alternatives to Breastfeeding
Whether by choice or necessity, many women turn to other options to nourish their babies, such as milk-sharing or infant formula. We have a number of resources with more information about these alternatives. PRO TIP-> use these keywords for your own research: “milk sharing”, “infant formula”, risks, benefits, “human milk”, breastfeeding AND alternatives

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action believes that “breastfeeding is the right of all children and mothers”. We hope you find these resources helpful in furthering your awareness about breastfeeding and its impact on individuals and the world.

In the News: Race, bias, and the police – scholarly resources

Last week, the campus community came together to share and process thoughts and feelings regarding recent events involving police related deaths of African American men and the violent aftermath. The event was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Counseling and Psychological Services, Campus Life, and the Department of Psychology.


flickr photo shared by Cayusa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC ) license

During Monday’s conversation, hosts and audience members discussed ideas and resources that we thought some of you would like to explore further. (Links open in a new window and may require authentication with your SWAN username and password.)

UPDATE: The Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment has published a special issue titled “Police shooting of unarmed African American Males: Implications for the individual, the family, and the community.” It is freely available to the public until August 31, 2016. Click here to access.

Race-based trauma
Also known as post-traumatic slave syndrome, race-based traumatic stress, this concept is based on the theory that racial discrimination can be experienced as psychological trauma. Below are some scholarly resources to explore this theory further. PRO TIP-> To continue the search, try different keyword combinations like “racial trauma” or (post AND slave AND syndrome)

Carter, R. T. (2007). Racism and psychological and emotional injury: Recognizing and assessing race-based traumatic stress. Counseling Psychologist, 35(1), 13-105.

DeGruy, J. (2005). Post-traumatic slave syndrome: America’s legacy of enduring injury and healing. Milwaukie, Oregon: Uptone Press. (Book available through GIL Express)

Hardy, K. V. (2013). Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma. Reclaiming Children & Youth, 22(1), 24-28.

Polanco-Roman, L., Danies, A., & Anglin, D. M. (2016). Racial discrimination as race-based trauma, coping strategies, and dissociative symptoms among emerging adults. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy.

Wilkins, E., Whiting, J., Watson, M., Russon, J., & Moncrief, A. (2013). Residual effects of slavery: What clinicians need to know. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 35(1), 14-28.

Police training and use of force
Representatives from Campus Safety discussed officer training protocols and techniques they use to prevent violence and combat bias. Here are some reports and examples from the literature about police training and conduct. PRO TIP-> Try using these keywords in your own searches: police, training, “law enforcement officer”, “community policing”, “racial bias”

Crime and Police Conduct (Short report from CQ Researcher explores the question “Is a national crime wave starting?”)

Police Tactics: Has U.S. law enforcement become militarized? (Full report from CQ Researcher)

Police Brutality (Issues & Controversies analysis of the question: Do U.S. police departments use appropriate force when dealing with the public?)

Correll, J., Hudson, S. M., Guillermo, S., & Ma, D. S. (2014). The Police Officer’s Dilemma: A Decade of Research on Racial Bias in the Decision to Shoot. Social & Personality Psychology Compass, 8(5), 201-213.

Hopkins, K. (2015). “Deadly force” revisited: Transparency and accountability for D.C. police use of force. National Lawyers Guild Review, 72(3), 129-160.

Sozer, M. A., & Merlo, A. V. (2013). The impact of community policing on crime rates: does the effect of community policing differ in large and small law enforcement agencies?. Police Practice & Research, 14(6), 506-521.

Implicit Bias
Implicit bias
refers to the automatic and involuntary biases we experience as a result of a lifetime of direct and indirect messaging about ourselves and others. We may not be aware of our own implicit biases, and they may be in direct conflict with our deeply held beliefs. PRO TIP-> Try these keywords for more articles like the ones below: “social bias”, “racial bias”, “implicit attitudes”, “implicit association”, “implicit bias”

Project Implicit – Harvard University Discover your own implicit associations by participating in Project Implicit. Multiple online tests measure the strength of automatic associations between concepts (like black people or women) and value judgments (like “bad” or “clumsy”).

Ito, T. A., Friedman, N. P., Bartholow, B. D., Correll, J., Loersch, C., Altamirano, L. J., & Miyake, A. (2015). Toward a comprehensive understanding of executive cognitive function in implicit racial bias. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108(2), 187-218.

Marks, D. L. (2015). Who, me? Am I guilty of implicit bias?. Judges’ Journal, 54(4), 20-25.

van Nunspeet, F., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (2015). Reducing implicit bias: How moral motivation helps people refrain from making ‘automatic’ prejudiced associations. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 1(4), 382-391.

Data and Statistics
Last but not least, we want to share with you some resources on finding reliable data about these issues. We’ve compiled a list of sources for statistics on the Statistical Resources for Assignments! LibGuide. See the Crime & Justice tab for resources related to this topic. Additionally, here are some government reports related to police use of force.

Banks, D., Couzens, L., & Planty, M. (2015). Assessment of coverage in the Arrest-Related Deaths program. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249099). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Hyland, S., Langton, L., & Davis, E. (2015). Police use of nonfatal force, 2002–11. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249216). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

National Institute of Justice. (1999). Use of force by police: Overview of national and local data (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 176330). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Where to go next
If you would like help or more suggestions for researching any of these or other topics, please consult a librarian. We are accessible via phone, email, instant message, or text. Find us here: http://clayton.libanswers.com/

If you are experiencing any feelings of anxiety, depression, or grief as a result of these events or you would like someone to talk to process any feelings you may have, please contact Counseling and Psychological Services for support or referral.

July Featured Resource: Revolutionary War Archives

Revolutionary War Archives contains foundational records for the new nation including Papers of the Continental Congress, the official records of the original colonies and the early United States, Constitutional Convention records, and other historical documents representing and revealing the process of the Constitution’s creation.

The collection includes:

  • Constitution Convention Records
  • Foreign Letters of the Continental Congress
  • Revolutionary War Rolls
  • Service Records
  • Prize Cases & Pensions

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Independence Day holiday hours

hoursjuly4The library is closed July 2nd-4th in observance of Independence Day. Our electronic resources LibGuides, GALILEO and CSU Catalog are available for your research needs. Use the Off-Campus Access to Electronic Resources or Library Research guides for assistance.

If you have items to return, you can use the book drop near Jazzman’s in the University Center.

We will reopen Tuesday, July 5th with our regular hours, 8am – 9pm.

We wish you all a happy and safe Fourth of July.

June Featured Resource: Cochrane Library

The Cochrane Library is an evidence-based medicine resource that summarizes results of high-quality medical research to support health care decision-making.

06-Jun-Cochrane

The collection consists of 6 databases:

  1. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) This is the primary output of The Cochrane Collaboration. Each Cochrane Review identifies an  intervention for a specific disease (or other problem in health care) and determines whether or not this  intervention works by summarizing the results of research gathered from randomized controlled trials
  2. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). This database includes details of published trials taken from bibliographic databases and other published resources. CENTRAL includes the title of the article, information on where it was published and, in many cases, the abstract.
  3. Cochrane Methodology Register (CMR) A bibliography of publications that report on methods used when conducting controlled trials, studies of methods used in reviews, and more general methodological studies which could be relevant to anyone  preparing systematic reviews. Records include  journal articles, books and conference proceedings.
  4. Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) is a unique database, containing abstracts of systematic reviews that have been quality assessed. Each abstract includes a summary of the review together with a critical commentary about the overall quality. DARE contains more than 19,000 such abstracts. Produced by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) in York, UK.
  5. Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA)
    Details of completed and ongoing health technology assessments (studies of the medical, social, ethical and economic implications of healthcare interventions) from around the world. Produced by the CRD in York, UK
  6. NHS Economic Evaluation Database (EED) Economic evaluations from around the world, evaluated for quality and highlighting relative strengths and  weaknesses of each study. Produced by the CRD in York, UK.

Research guides and tutorials are available from inside the Cochrane Library.

Study Room Reservations

Get ready to do your happy dance.

via Giphy.com

We are excited to officially announce the beta release of the study room reservations system. Study rooms are so popular they now can be reserved up to 14 days in advance and require a minimum of 2 people. Read below for the basic information to get you started.

Who Can Reserve?

  • Clayton State University degree seeking students and currently employed faculty & staff
  • Library account must be free of overdue items or fees

Visit the Study Rooms LibGuide for full usage guidelines

Reservation Requirements

  • Groups must consist of at least 2 people
    • Exceptions:
      L140 requires at least 7 people
      L212 requires at least 4 people
  • Maximum reservation length is 3 hours
  • Only 1 reservation per person, per day is allowed

Need help selecting the best room for your group? See Room Descriptions for a summary of our study rooms.

How to Reserve a Study Room

  1. Type libraryrooms.sp.clayton.edu into the address bar of any web browser and sign in with your @student.clayton.edu or @clayton.edu account when prompted
    • You can also click on the red Room Reservations button from the library’s homepage
      reservations-libguides-button
  2. From the Reservation Date field, select your preferred date from the pop-up calendar
    reservations-calendar
  3. Select the Start and End times for your reservation
    reservations-time
  4. Pick a study room that best matches your groups needs
    reservations-roomsddm
  5. Enter the total number of your group
    reservations-occupancy
  6. Reserve a Study Room
    reservations-submit-button
  7. Open your Mail app from the Apps square to read and save your confirmation email
    reservations-email

Still have questions?

Learn how to find us in-person and online and ask us anything at http://clayton.libanswers.com