World Breastfeeding Week resources

We are excited to highlight resources in support of World Breastfeeding Week, August 1st – August 7th. World Breastfeeding Week is sponsored by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action whose purpose is to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding worldwide. We believe we can contribute to this goal by educating ourselves and others, and we want to do just that.

For many mothers, breastfeeding can be overwhelming. It brings on a new set of challenges that add to the challenge of taking care of a newborn baby. Additional hurdles may appear when nursing moms return to work. Although breastfeeding can seem stressful, it does come with benefits for mom and baby.

Breastfeeding week provides us with the opportunity to share some of our scholarly resources that explore these challenges and benefits. We have chosen some of our favorite articles, videos, and books regarding breastfeeding and its importance to the health of mothers, their children, and their communities. (Electronic resources require a Clayton State username and password for off-campus access)

General Information on Infant Nutrition and Breastfeeding

  • The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. (1963). Physical book published by La Leche League International.
  • The Breastfeeding Sourcebook: Everything You Need to Know. (1996) Electronic book by Sara Rosenthal
  • Feeding Your Baby (streaming video)
    This program demonstrates breastfeeding positions and techniques, as well as breast milk storage. It also covers bottle feeding, choosing a formula, bottle and nipple care, and feeding techniques. (17 minutes)
  • Nutrition for Infants and Children (streaming video)
    This video explains the importance of good nutrition for newborns, infants, and toddlers and examines its beneficial effects on their growth and development. (26 minutes)
  • The Milky Way: Every Mother Has a Story (streaming video)
    This film looks at postnatal care, public policies, and cultural norms related to breastfeeding in the U.S. and Sweden. Experts explain the nutritional, physiological, immunological, and psychological benefits of breastfeeding for mother and child. (1:33:15)

Challenges and Overcoming Barriers to Breastfeeding
Mothers face physical, social, and emotional challenges to initiating and continuing breastfeeding. PRO TIP-> try these keywords for further research: breastfeeding, lactation, nursing, barriers, challenges, struggles, pain, social, emotion*, difficult*, attitude

Health Benefits
The articles below highlight a few of the health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and children. PRO TIP-> To narrow your search to specific benefits, try a mix of these search terms: breastfeeding, benefits, child, mother, outcomes, health, “mental health”, obesity, “oral health”

Sustainable Development
The 2016 theme for World Breastfeeding Week is “A Key to Sustainable Development”, seeking to raise awareness of the links between breastfeeding and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) identified by the United Nations in 2015. Learn more about the SDG’s here. PRO TIP-> use the Boolean operator “AND” to connect the keyword “breastfeeding” with a keyword from an SDG to continue searching. Examples: breastfeeding AND “clean water”; breastfeeding AND poverty

Alternatives to Breastfeeding
Whether by choice or necessity, many women turn to other options to nourish their babies, such as milk-sharing or infant formula. We have a number of resources with more information about these alternatives. PRO TIP-> use these keywords for your own research: “milk sharing”, “infant formula”, risks, benefits, “human milk”, breastfeeding AND alternatives

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action believes that “breastfeeding is the right of all children and mothers”. We hope you find these resources helpful in furthering your awareness about breastfeeding and its impact on individuals and the world.

IN THE NEWS: Race, bias, and the police – scholarly resources

Last week, the campus community came together to share and process thoughts and feelings regarding recent events involving police related deaths of African American men and the violent aftermath. The event was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Counseling and Psychological Services, Campus Life, and the Department of Psychology.


flickr photo shared by Cayusa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC ) license

During Monday’s conversation, hosts and audience members discussed ideas and resources that we thought some of you would like to explore further. (Links open in a new window and may require authentication with your SWAN username and password.)

UPDATE: The Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment has published a special issue titled “Police shooting of unarmed African American Males: Implications for the individual, the family, and the community.” It is freely available to the public until August 31, 2016. Click here to access.

Race-based trauma
Also known as post-traumatic slave syndrome, race-based traumatic stress, this concept is based on the theory that racial discrimination can be experienced as psychological trauma. Below are some scholarly resources to explore this theory further. PRO TIP-> To continue the search, try different keyword combinations like “racial trauma” or (post AND slave AND syndrome)

Carter, R. T. (2007). Racism and psychological and emotional injury: Recognizing and assessing race-based traumatic stress. Counseling Psychologist, 35(1), 13-105.

DeGruy, J. (2005). Post-traumatic slave syndrome: America’s legacy of enduring injury and healing. Milwaukie, Oregon: Uptone Press. (Book available through GIL Express)

Hardy, K. V. (2013). Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma. Reclaiming Children & Youth, 22(1), 24-28.

Polanco-Roman, L., Danies, A., & Anglin, D. M. (2016). Racial discrimination as race-based trauma, coping strategies, and dissociative symptoms among emerging adults. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy.

Wilkins, E., Whiting, J., Watson, M., Russon, J., & Moncrief, A. (2013). Residual effects of slavery: What clinicians need to know. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 35(1), 14-28.

Police training and use of force
Representatives from Campus Safety discussed officer training protocols and techniques they use to prevent violence and combat bias. Here are some reports and examples from the literature about police training and conduct. PRO TIP-> Try using these keywords in your own searches: police, training, “law enforcement officer”, “community policing”, “racial bias”

Crime and Police Conduct (Short report from CQ Researcher explores the question “Is a national crime wave starting?”)

Police Tactics: Has U.S. law enforcement become militarized? (Full report from CQ Researcher)

Police Brutality (Issues & Controversies analysis of the question: Do U.S. police departments use appropriate force when dealing with the public?)

Correll, J., Hudson, S. M., Guillermo, S., & Ma, D. S. (2014). The Police Officer’s Dilemma: A Decade of Research on Racial Bias in the Decision to Shoot. Social & Personality Psychology Compass, 8(5), 201-213.

Hopkins, K. (2015). “Deadly force” revisited: Transparency and accountability for D.C. police use of force. National Lawyers Guild Review, 72(3), 129-160.

Sozer, M. A., & Merlo, A. V. (2013). The impact of community policing on crime rates: does the effect of community policing differ in large and small law enforcement agencies?. Police Practice & Research, 14(6), 506-521.

Implicit Bias
Implicit bias
refers to the automatic and involuntary biases we experience as a result of a lifetime of direct and indirect messaging about ourselves and others. We may not be aware of our own implicit biases, and they may be in direct conflict with our deeply held beliefs. PRO TIP-> Try these keywords for more articles like the ones below: “social bias”, “racial bias”, “implicit attitudes”, “implicit association”, “implicit bias”

Project Implicit – Harvard University Discover your own implicit associations by participating in Project Implicit. Multiple online tests measure the strength of automatic associations between concepts (like black people or women) and value judgments (like “bad” or “clumsy”).

Ito, T. A., Friedman, N. P., Bartholow, B. D., Correll, J., Loersch, C., Altamirano, L. J., & Miyake, A. (2015). Toward a comprehensive understanding of executive cognitive function in implicit racial bias. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108(2), 187-218.

Marks, D. L. (2015). Who, me? Am I guilty of implicit bias?. Judges’ Journal, 54(4), 20-25.

van Nunspeet, F., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (2015). Reducing implicit bias: How moral motivation helps people refrain from making ‘automatic’ prejudiced associations. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 1(4), 382-391.

Data and Statistics
Last but not least, we want to share with you some resources on finding reliable data about these issues. We’ve compiled a list of sources for statistics on the Statistical Resources for Assignments! LibGuide. See the Crime & Justice tab for resources related to this topic. Additionally, here are some government reports related to police use of force.

Banks, D., Couzens, L., & Planty, M. (2015). Assessment of coverage in the Arrest-Related Deaths program. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249099). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Hyland, S., Langton, L., & Davis, E. (2015). Police use of nonfatal force, 2002–11. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 249216). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

National Institute of Justice. (1999). Use of force by police: Overview of national and local data (Bureau of Justice Statistics Report No. NCJ 176330). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Where to go next
If you would like help or more suggestions for researching any of these or other topics, please consult a librarian. We are accessible via phone, email, instant message, or text. Find us here: http://clayton.libanswers.com/

If you are experiencing any feelings of anxiety, depression, or grief as a result of these events or you would like someone to talk to process any feelings you may have, please contact Counseling and Psychological Services for support or referral.

July Featured Resource: Revolutionary War Archives

Revolutionary War Archives contains foundational records for the new nation including Papers of the Continental Congress, the official records of the original colonies and the early United States, Constitutional Convention records, and other historical documents representing and revealing the process of the Constitution’s creation.

The collection includes:

  • Constitution Convention Records
  • Foreign Letters of the Continental Congress
  • Revolutionary War Rolls
  • Service Records
  • Prize Cases & Pensions

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Independence Day holiday hours

hoursjuly4The library is closed July 2nd-4th in observance of Independence Day. Our electronic resources LibGuides, GALILEO and CSU Catalog are available for your research needs. Use the Off-Campus Access to Electronic Resources or Library Research guides for assistance.

If you have items to return, you can use the book drop near Jazzman’s in the University Center.

We will reopen Tuesday, July 5th with our regular hours, 8am – 9pm.

We wish you all a happy and safe Fourth of July.

June Featured Resource: Cochrane Library

The Cochrane Library is an evidence-based medicine resource that summarizes results of high-quality medical research to support health care decision-making.

06-Jun-Cochrane

The collection consists of 6 databases:

  1. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) This is the primary output of The Cochrane Collaboration. Each Cochrane Review identifies an  intervention for a specific disease (or other problem in health care) and determines whether or not this  intervention works by summarizing the results of research gathered from randomized controlled trials
  2. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). This database includes details of published trials taken from bibliographic databases and other published resources. CENTRAL includes the title of the article, information on where it was published and, in many cases, the abstract.
  3. Cochrane Methodology Register (CMR) A bibliography of publications that report on methods used when conducting controlled trials, studies of methods used in reviews, and more general methodological studies which could be relevant to anyone  preparing systematic reviews. Records include  journal articles, books and conference proceedings.
  4. Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) is a unique database, containing abstracts of systematic reviews that have been quality assessed. Each abstract includes a summary of the review together with a critical commentary about the overall quality. DARE contains more than 19,000 such abstracts. Produced by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) in York, UK.
  5. Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA)
    Details of completed and ongoing health technology assessments (studies of the medical, social, ethical and economic implications of healthcare interventions) from around the world. Produced by the CRD in York, UK
  6. NHS Economic Evaluation Database (EED) Economic evaluations from around the world, evaluated for quality and highlighting relative strengths and  weaknesses of each study. Produced by the CRD in York, UK.

Research guides and tutorials are available from inside the Cochrane Library.

Study Room Reservations

Get ready to do your happy dance.

via Giphy.com

We are excited to officially announce the beta release of the study room reservations system. Study rooms are so popular they now can be reserved up to 14 days in advance and require a minimum of 2 people. Read below for the basic information to get you started.

Who Can Reserve?

  • Clayton State University degree seeking students and currently employed faculty & staff
  • Library account must be free of overdue items or fees

Visit the Study Rooms LibGuide for full usage guidelines

Reservation Requirements

  • Groups must consist of at least 2 people
    • Exceptions:
      L140 requires at least 7 people
      L212 requires at least 4 people
  • Maximum reservation length is 3 hours
  • Only 1 reservation per person, per day is allowed

Need help selecting the best room for your group? See Room Descriptions for a summary of our study rooms.

How to Reserve a Study Room

  1. Type libraryrooms.sp.clayton.edu into the address bar of any web browser and sign in with your @student.clayton.edu or @clayton.edu account when prompted
    • You can also click on the red Room Reservations button from the library’s homepage
      reservations-libguides-button
  2. From the Reservation Date field, select your preferred date from the pop-up calendar
    reservations-calendar
  3. Select the Start and End times for your reservation
    reservations-time
  4. Pick a study room that best matches your groups needs
    reservations-roomsddm
  5. Enter the total number of your group
    reservations-occupancy
  6. Reserve a Study Room
    reservations-submit-button
  7. Open your Mail app from the Apps square to read and save your confirmation email
    reservations-email

Still have questions?

Learn how to find us in-person and online and ask us anything at http://clayton.libanswers.com

New service: Equipment rental

We understand. We’ve all done it. Your phone battery is dying and you left your charger at home.

via Giphy.com

Or maybe your laptop suddenly quit working and you absolutely need one to take notes in your class that starts in 10 minutes. Or you want to Skype with the friend you met on your study abroad trip last semester but your computer doesn’t have a webcam.

We understand. We get it. And we’ve got you covered.

We now offer a variety of electronic equipment to borrow for your convenience.

via Giphy.com

In addition to the short (4 hour) loan items in the table below, you may borrow a portable DVD player for 7 days to take on your next road trip.

Adapters & Cables Media Production Laptops
HDMI Mini or Micro Adapters  Headphones Dell Laptops 
2 in 1 Mini Displayport to HDMI VGA  Wireless Presenter
Laptop Power Cables  Logitech Webcam 
Apple Chargers  GorillaPod Stand Small 
Samsung Chargers  GorillaPod Stand Large
Anker Portable Charger  GorillaPod Video Small 

With the exception of laptops and DVD players, equipment is available at service desks on both levels of the library. Laptops and DVD players are only available at the Circulation Desk on the Lower Level.

More information about borrowing equipment is available on the Equipment @ the Clayton State Library LibGuide

Group Study Room updates

Hear ye! Hear ye!

 

Do we have your attention yet? Good.

A little over five months ago we unveiled the newly renovated library and, along with it, 12 group study rooms. These have proven to be immensely popular and we’ve received a lot of helpful feedback from you about how to make them better. So, with another installment of “You asked. We answered.“, we’d like to fill you in on the latest  changes to the Group Study Room usage guidelines and procedures.

ch-ch-ch-changes

The two items you requested most were:

  1. the option to make an advanced reservation
  2. a minimum occupancy requirement

We are happy to say that both of these have been addressed in the new guidelines. The beta version of the online reservation system will go live next Monday, June 6th. Watch for more announcements and updates at that time.

Some preliminary questions you may have are answered below. You can find more details and a link to the reservation system at the Study Room LibGuide.

Study Room Changes

Summer 2016 Break and Semester Hours

We maintain our regular semester hours throughout finals, but as soon as you hit submit on that last multiple choice or short answer question, we will convert to our semester break hours. Then we’ll start all over when the summer semester begins on May 21. See below for specifics on opening and closing hours as well as when we’ll close for holidays and special occasions.

Library Summer Hours

May 10 – May 20
Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 9am – 6pm

May 21 – July 25
Mon – Thur 8am – 9pm
Friday 8am – 6pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 12pm – 9pm

July 26 – August 14
Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 9am – 6pm

The library will be CLOSED on the following days:
Thursday, May 19
Monday, May 30
Monday, July 4

We wish you all a warm and relaxing summer break and a productive and rewarding semester. We hope you’ll come by for a visit. We’ll be here!

Captain America: Civil War

Today is the much anticipated premiere of Captain America: Civil War. It is the latest addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The film features an ensemble cast with Chris Evans as Captain America and Robert Downey, Jr. as Iron Man. The plot revolves around the collateral damage from an incident involving Captain America and his team of Avengers. The government feels as a result of such incidents, superheroes need to be regulated to prevent harm and loss of life. Captain America believes the Avengers must remain free to defend humanity without government regulations while Iron Man supports the notion that accountability to the government is necessary to prevent further tragedy. Their opposing viewpoints create a division among their fellow Avengers, bringing both sides into conflict with Captain America’s friend, the Winter Soldier.

The film is based on a critically acclaimed graphic novel by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven titled Civil War which was originally published as a series from 2006-2007. It was a crossover event that impacted the entire Marvel Comics Universe. In the graphic novel, the government passes a Superhuman Registration Act following a tragedy where an entire town was destroyed by the recklessness of a superhero team’s fight with a villain. The death toll was very high and public outcry demanded action. Captain America, along with a number of other heroes, opposes the Act. Those who support the Registration Act are led by Iron Man and his faction of heroes. The theme of the story revolves around discussions about freedom and security. The story impacted the Marvel Universe as the fallout included the assassination of Captain America. (He came back by the way; no one ever stays dead in comics except Spider-Man’s Uncle Ben). This summer, Marvel is publishing a sequel, Civil War II. The 0 issue of Civil War II will be given away on Free Comic Book Day on May 7 at local comic shops.

Keep reading to learn how to find Civil War and other graphic novels at a library near you.
captainamerica

Graphic Novels and Libraries

Criticism, History, Origin

Civil War: A Marvel Comics Event written by Mark Millar; illustrated by Steve McNiven

Request a copy from Georgia State University, Perimeter College using GIL Express, from local public libraries using Interlibrary Loan, or by visiting your local public library with your PINES card.

Read more about other Avengers characters in our collections:

Many graphic novels and reprinted comic books can be found in our collections: